Personal Fragrance Toilette

It is a simple task to make delicately scented eau de cologne, floral waters, and oils. The water can be used for scent only or added to other herbal preparations in place of an infusion or for added fragrance. Oils can be added to the bath or used to scent the skin.

The amounts in the following recipes are for fresh herbs. If you are using dried herbs, use only half as much.


Spicy Eau De Toilette:
6 Tbsp chopped angelica leaves
6 Tbsp chopped basil
2 Bay leaves
2 Tbsp coriander seeds
1 Nutmeg, broken into small pieces
1 Tbsp cloves
three 3-inch cinnamon sticks, crushed
2 cups unscented rubbing alcohol or vodka

Place all ingredients in a glass jar with a tight-fitting cover. Let the jar sit in a warm place for several weeks, then strain and pour the eau de cologne into a sterilized bottle.

Eau De Cologne:
½ cup Lavender
¼ cup Rosemary
Peel of 1 lemon
Peel of 1 orange
½ cup orange mint
½ cup lemon balm
2 cups rose water
2 cups vodka

Place all ingredients in a large glass jar with a cover and let them steep for 8 to 10 days. Strain and pour into a sterilized bottle.

Make a fresh smelling eau de cologne by soaking fragrant herbs, spices and fresh-scented citrus in alcohol or vodka. Steeping angelica, basil and spices in alcohol or vodka produces a spicy cologne suitable for either sex. Colognes can be sweetly floral, pungently herbal or headily spicy.

Learn to Grow Your Own Herbs Here

Successful Gardening ~
Kali S. Winters


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Herbal Soap ~ Making Your Own


Making soap from scratch is an ambitious project that requires special ingredients such as lye and equipment that should be set aside for soap making only.  However, you can easily make your own herbal soap by starting with pure glycerine or castile soap and an herbal infusion. The addition of a little lanoline (available at your pharmacy) makes the soap very creamy and less drying to the skin.  If you want to give the soap even more of an herbal kick, you can also stir some of the chopped herb into the soap just before pouring it into the molds.

Rose Soap: You can increase the amounts of rose oil and coloring for a more intense rose impact if desired. In place of rose water you may want to try a combination of peppermint and rosemary; lemon balm or lemon verbena; orange mint; rose geranium; or lavender.

Ingredients:

Two 10-ounce bars of glycerine soap
½ – 1 cup rose water
1 Tbsp anhydrous lanolin
10 drops rose oil
10 drops red food coloring

Grate the soap with the grating disc of a food processor or by hand.  Combine the grated soap and ½ cup of the rose water in a glass or enamel container and melt over low heat, stirring occasionally. This may take some time; adding more rose water will speed the process, but the more liquid you add, the softer the finished soap will be.  When the soap is melted, stir in the lanolin, mixing well. Add the rose oil and the food coloring, stirring until blended. The herbal infusion may turn the soap the color of old oatmeal, but he addition of food coloring will remedy this.  Add the coloring drop by drop so that you can control the color. Remove from the heat.

Lightly oil several clean small round metal cans or a cut-off –milk carton with almond or vegetable oil.  The cans make individual soaps, the milk carton a bar that can then be cut into the sizes you want. Pour the soap into the molds, making sure there are no air bubbles. Let the soap set for a day or two before removing from the molds. At this point you can carefully cut large bars into individual cakes. Allow the soap to sit out to dry until it is quite hard.

Herbal soaps such as these of rose or a blend of rosemary and mint are easily made by melting grated castile or glycerine soap with an herbal infusion. Melt down any scraps or leftover bits with lots of water to make a gentle liquid soap to keep by the sink.

Successful Gardening ~
Kali S. Winters



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Herbal Skin Lotions
Personal Fragrance Toilette
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Make Lavender Wands

Fragrant Lavender Wands

Makes The Perfect Gift
Fun & Easy To Make

Lavender WandsTo capture summer’s magic fragrance in your linens and wool sweaters, make a lavender sachet utilizing the stems as well as the flowers. We like to call these lavender wands (because of the magic lavender scent inside) instead of lavender sticks or as the British call them, lavender bottles.

You will need:
Fresh blossoming lavender stems
3 to 5 yards of ¼” satin ribbon in soft pastel colors and Thread to match
Straight pins
Toothpicks
You may use velvet ribbon, which looks nice but doesn’t slide easily, and it does cost more.

To start: You want to pick 13 to 19 stems, always using an uneven number (it is easier to start with 13 and graduate up). Pick the lavender in mid to late morning when the dew is off the flowers and the sun has not yet broiled the fragrance into the wind. The stems and flowers must be used immediately; otherwise they will break.


Bending the Lavender

Step 1: Tie the blossoms securely together with thread or a sturdy rubber band.

Step 2: Hold the blossoms with your left hand with the stems upward.

Step 3: Bend the stems down, one by one, very carefully, to form a parasol or umbrella.

Step 4: Place the ribbon (the length depends on how many stems are used), satin side up, under your left thumb and hold it securely on top of the blossoms.

Making Lavender Wands

Step 5: Weave the ribbon in and out of the stems in a basket weave for 2 or 3 rows.

Step 6: Bend the stems down over the flowers. Now the ribbon will look messy. Simply take a toothpick or crocket hook and tighten the ribbon until a neatly woven effect is achieved. Don’t pull so tight that the stems stain the ribbon.

Step 7: Continue weaving the ribbon in and out until the blossoms are covered.

Step 8: When you have 4 or 5 inches of woven stems, wrap the ribbon around the stems and secure with a pin. Let dry for two weeks.

Step 9: The stems will shrink while drying. Trim the stems even. Neaten appearance with toothpick as before. Wrap remaining ribbon around stems and secure with matching thread. A bow may be tied at either or both end of the stems.

Successful Gardening ~
Kali S. Winters


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Lavendar Oils
Herbing Guide

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Fragrant Oils


Natural oils which encapsulate the fragrance of the flower or herb form the essence of many cosmetics.

Concentrated herbal oils can be purchased from a herbalist or chemist as there is great skill in preparing such items. However, the following instructions will enable you to create light floral oils with scented flower petals. Use a measuring cup to weight the petals.

Ingredients:
1 ¼ cups Almond Oil
2 ½ quarts Flower Petals
1 tsp Liquid Storax
1 tsp Tincture of Benzoin

Directions:
Warm the oil in the top of a double saucepan over simmering water. Add 2 cups of petals, stir, cover and leave over a low heat for 2 hours, checking regularly to ensure that the pan does not boil dry. Strain and reserve the flowers. Add another 2 cups of flowers to the oil and repeat the process until all the flowers have been used.

Pour the oil and all the flowers into a large pan, bring to a boil slowly then simmer gently for 40 minutes. Strain the oil through muslin (cheesecloth), pressing to extract all the oil form the petals. Stir in the liquid storax and tincture of benzoin to fix the fragrance, pour into bottles, seal, label and store in a dry, dark place.

For a relaxing and fragrant bath oil, mix one part homemade floral or herbal oil with three parts almond oil for an oil which will float on the water, or with Turkey red dispersing oil. Pour the oil into bottles, seal, label and store. These bath oils make excellent gifts. Only a teaspoonful is need in the bath.

To counteract the dry nature of soap, add a cupful of herbal vinegar to your bath water.

Learn to make your own natural Shampoos and Conditioners Here!

Kali S. Winters



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Fresh & Easy Herb Gardens
Starting An Herb Garden
Personal Fragrance Toilette
Herbal Soap ~ Making Your Own

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Herbal Cosmetics

Herbal Perfume

Herbal Bath

          

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Potpourri Recipes

Keep potpourri in bowls topped with dried flower buds or in pretty glass jars with a lace covering, in little sachets of lace or special potpourri containers.

The simplest way to make potpourri is to dry fragrant leaves and petals until they are crisp, blend them with fixatives to absorb and preserve the scent and seal them in an airtight container for about four weeks to mature, shaking the mixture occasionally. A few drops of essential oil adds that final touch. Essential oils can also be used to liven up potpourri as the fragrance fades.


For color, use herbs such as roses, marigolds with garden flowers such as pansies, lily of the valley, orange blossom, hyacinth or cornflowers. Many herb leaves and flowers provide fragrance: bergamot, basil, bay, thyme, rosemary, lemon balm, camomile or lavender with garden flowers such as jasmine, mimosa, honeysuckle, carnation or pinks. A little spice, either cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mace or citrus rind, adds sharpness and interest.

As a rough guide, mix about 3 ¾ cups of flower petals and herb leaves with 2 tablespoons of spices and 4 tablespoons of fixative. There are many fixatives you can use but ground orris root is simple and effective. This mixture will need two or three drops of essential oil. Here are some suggestions for potpourri recipes:

Recipe 1:
1 cup each Lemon verbena and lemon balm leaves
1 cup each Forsythia, marigold and camomile flowers
A few thin strips of lemon rind
¼ cup Ground orris root
A few drops of lemon verbena oil

Recipe 2:
1 cup each Thyme, rosemary and mint leaves
2 cups Lavender flowers
2 tablespoons Tansy leaves
2 tablespoons Ground cloves
¼ cup Ground Orris root
A few drops of lavender oil

Recipe 3:
1 cup Lavender flowers
2 tablespoons each Thyme and mint leaves
1 tablespoon each Ground cloves and ground caraway seeds

More Herbal Crafts

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Kali S Winters
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Herbal Skin Lotions


Herbal lotions can be used for washing, added to bath water, hair rinses or to scent water for washing clothes and laundry.

Pour boiling water over 1 cup of fragrant herbs – bergamot, lavender, lemon balm, sage, camomile, marjoram, mint, rosemary, sweet cicely or thyme – so they are just covered, simmer over a low heat for 10 minutes, let stand until cool then strain. Equal quantities of water and wine vinegar with sage and rue leaves and 1 teaspoon of ground ginger, make an unusual toilet water.

For an instant herbal bath, place a few herbs in a muslin (cheesecloth) bag with a spoonful of oatmeal to soften the water and hang the bag beneath the hot tap of the bath.

Herbal vinegars can be added to bath water, washing water, hair rinsing water or water used to wash clothes.

Camomile flowers make a delightful foam bath. Crush 4 tablespoons of dried camomile flowers and mix with 1 ¼ cups of milk and chill overnight. The moisturizing milk is then ready for use but must be stored in the refrigerator.

A tablespoon of herbal vinegar added to 2/3 cup of water or rainwater makes an excellent toner for greasy skin. For normal or dry skin, use 2/3 cup of rose water, 3 tablespoons of orange flower water and 3 tablespoons of glycerine to make a soothing skin tonic.

Mint has many cosmetic uses, including a skin toner. Infuse 2 tablespoons of chopped apple mint in 3 tablespoons of white wine vinegar for a week, shaking daily, then strain the vinegar and pour on 1 ¼ cups of boiling water. Leave to cool, then bottle, seal and label. Mint also makes a refreshing facemask. Simmer 4 tablespoons of chopped mint with 4 tablespoons of water for 5 minutes then remove form the heat and stir in 1 tablespoon of clear honey, 3 tablespoons of milk and 2 tablespoons of fine oatmeal. Leave to cool then apply to the face and leave for at least 15 minutes before rinsing off with lukewarm water.

Carrier Oils for Hair and Skin


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Kali S Winters



Herbal Crafts

Herbs are not only valuable in the kitchen, in cosmetics and medicines, they are also very beautiful and can be used, both fresh and dried, to decorate and scent your home or as charming gifts.

Fresh Herb Arrangements

Herbs can be made into decorative and fragrant arrangements either alone or with other garden flowers. Rosemary, sage, borage, feverfew, marjoram, lemon balm, thyme, chives, mint, camomile and parsley are all attractive either in leaf or in flower, while seed heads of fennel, caraway or dill add contrast and interest.

A limited color range often works best; include variety of texture as well as of leaf shape. Most containers can be used but country-style pottery looks particularly attractive, especially as informal arrangements suit herbs best. Evergreen herbs, such as sage and rosemary, make excellent foliage backgrounds for brighter flowers, especially in the winter when options for fresh arrangements are limited. Use dry florist’s foam (Styrofoam) held in place with a spike or tape, to help you shape your arrangement.

Posies of fresh herbs make delightful gifts or table decorations. Tie a few herb sprigs into a posy, sit a small doily to the center and wrap it around the back of the posy to resemble a lace frill. Finish with a pretty ribbon. A handful of posies in a basket makes a pretty and fragrant table- center decoration.


Dried Herb Arrangements

Herbs make excellent additions to your dried flower arrangements, whether you use seed heads, flower stems, leaves or grasses. Follow the same design principles as you would when creating a fresh arrangement. For dried arrangements, your choice of containers is unlimited as they do not need to be watertight and baskets really come into their own. If the materials are fragile, wire the stems or wire bunches of stems together.

Dried herbal wreaths can be made using a florist’s foam (Styrofoam) ring, available from good florists, or you can bind thick twine or straw around a circle of wire. Use dense leaves, such as bay to form a dark background then gradually build up a pattern of sprigs of lavender, rosemary, sage and other herbs. You can vary this idea by making dried arrangements on spheres of dry florist’s foam (Styrofoam).

Lavender Bottles

Traditionally used to scent linen drawers and keep away moths, lavender bottles require long stemmed lavender flowers, picked just as they come into flower. Tie together a bunch of about 20 stalks just below the flower heads, then bend the stalks up and over the flower heads and tie again above the flowers so that they are enclosed in the stalks. Trim the ends. Weave a fine ribbon in and out of the stalks to enclose the flower heads.

Scented Sachets

Sachets made of cotton lawn, tied at the top and decorated with a ribbon bow, make lovely gifts or are also nice to keep for yourself! Use 1 cup each of dried lavender flowers and dried rosemary and mix with 1 cup each of ground orris root and a few drops of oil of roses or with a few tablespoons of crushed cloves and a tablespoon of powdered fried orange rind.

Pressed Herb Crafts

Pressed herbs can be used to make bookmarks, greeting cards and pictures or even to decorate jars for gifts of homemade herbal cosmetics or preserves. Collect together all your materials before you start: a soft paintbrush, rubber-based glue, the pressed petals and leaves and the item you wish to decorate.

Sketch your design roughly then practice positioning the herbs, moving them with a paintbrush until you have a pleasing arrangement. Your designs should be simple until you have gained a little experience and confidence; try reproducing a simple flower, banquet or arrangement.

When you are happy with the design, lift the pieces and apply some glue with a cocktail stick (toothpick). If there are several layers to the design, let one layer dry before adding the next. Cover flat designs with a sheet of glass or board and weigh down with books overnight so that the herbs dry flat. Cover designs on glass or jars with adhesive film or glass, or paint with lacquer to protect them. Pressed flower pictures should be kept out ot direct sunlight so that they do not fade.



Learn to Grow Your Own Herbs At Home Here!

Kali S Winters

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Herbal Shampoo Recipe

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Herbal Cosmetics

Originally toiletries and cosmetics were, of course, all made from local, natural ingredients. Today cosmetics abound in chemists, department stores and specialist shops. But it is very satisfying to create effective and natural cosmetics of your own. What is more, herbal preparations have many beneficial qualities in addition to their distinctive fragrances. Lavender and camomile are relaxing, comfrey regulates ageing skin, sage gives relief from aching muscles, spearmint and thyme are refreshing, rosemary and angelica are stimulating, while lovage is supposed to make you more lovable!

Herb Soaps

You can add the herbal fragrance of your choice to unperfumed castile soap by grating the soap and melting it in the top of a double saucepan over simmering water. Stir in a teaspoon of almond or vegetable oil and a teaspoon of honey and stir over the heat for 5 minutes. Stir in a few drops of essential herb oil and leave the soap to cool and harden.



Soap used to be made with tallow but you can substitute vegetable oils and make your own soap, following the recipe below. Take great care when using the caustic soda. Vary the herbs you use, add honey or oatmeal and use a variety of different shaped molds such as jelly molds, yogurt pots or baking dishes.

Ingredients:
1 ¼ cups Water
4 Tbsp Caustic Soda
3 Tbsp Sunflower Oil
5 Tbsp Olive Oil
2 tsp Herbal Oil
3 Tbsp Chopped Marjoram

Directions:
Place the water in a glass bowl, add the caustic soda and stir with a wooden spoon until it is dissolved. The soda will heat spontaneously. Set aside until lukewarm. Meanwhile, warm the oils to the same temperature. Pour the oil slowly into the soda, stirring continuously, then add the marjoram and beat until the mixture thickens and turns opaque. Pour into molds, stand on a cooling rack and leave in a warm, dry place for 24 hours until set. Remove from the molds, wrap in wax paper and leave in a col plac for 2-3 weeks to harden.

Fragrant Oils

Natural oils which encapsulate the fragrance of the flower or herb, form the essence of many cosmetics. Concentrated herbal oils must be purchased from a herbalist or chemist as there is great skill in preparing such items. However, the following instructions will enable you to create light floral oils with scented flower petals. Use a measuring cup to weight the petals.

Ingredients:
1 ¼ cups Almond Oil
2 ½ quarts Flower Petals
1 tsp Liquid Storax
1 tspTincture of benzoin

Directions:
Warm the oil in the top of a double saucepan over simmering water. Add 2 cups of petals, stir, cover and leave over a low heat for 2 hours, checking regulary to ensure that the pan does not boil dry. Strain and reserve the flowers. Add another 2 cups of flowers to the oil and repeat the process until all the flowers have been used.

Pour the oil and all the flowers into a large pan, bring to a boil slowly then simmer gently for 40 minutes. Strain the oil through muslin (Cheese Cloth), pressing to extract all the oil from the petals. Stir in the liquid storax and tincture of bonzoin to fix the fragrance, pour into bottles, seal, lable and store in dry, dark place.

For a relaxing and fragrant bath oil, mix one part homemade floral or herbal oil with three parts almond oil for an oil which will float on the water, or with Turkey red dispersing oil. Pour the oil into bottles, seal, label and store. These bath oils make excellent gifts. Only a teaspoonful is needed in the bath. To counteract the drying nature of soap add a cupful of herbal vinegar to your bath water. Brush on skin after each bath…store in a dry place.

Herbal Powders

Make small quantities of fragrant powders to brush lightly on the skin after a bath – all you need to do is grind the following ingredients together until they are very fine. Mix ¼ cup each of dried rose petals, lavender flowers and ground orris root with ¼ cup of cornflour (cornstarch).



Discover over 1000 Recipes for Hair Remedies At Home Here!

Successful Gardening ~
Kali S. Winters

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Herbal Soap ~ Making Your Own
Starting An Herb Garden
Herbal Skin Lotions
Herbal Shampoo Recipe

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Herbal Shampoo Recipe


Use camomile for fair hair, rosemary or sage leaves or lavender flowers for dark hair and marigold petals for red hair. Eggs add protein to the shampoo and make it richer; for greasy hair, use egg whites only.

Ingredients:
7 cups Boiling water
1 cup Herbs or petals
5 Tbsp Grated Castile Soap
2 Eggs (optional)

Directions:
Pour the water over the herbs or petals, stir well, cover and leave to infuse for 2 hours. Strain into a saucepan, pressing all the moisture from the herbs. Stir in the soap and whisk in the eggs, if using, pour into bottles and label. Shake the bottle well before using and rinse thoroughly after use.

Conditioners & Rinses

The herbs suggested for shampoos for different hair colors can be used in conditions and rinses as well, or you can try peppermint or nettle leaves, elder or yarrow flowers or fennel seeds. As a scalp conditioner, mix equal quantities of almond oil and herb oil and warm them slightly. Rub the oil into the scalp, wrap a warm towel around your head and leave for 15 minutes before shampooing and rinsing. For a richer conditioner, mix a teaspoon of fragrant oil and an egg into 4 tablespoons of plain yogert and apply in the same way.

Add a few spoonfuls of herbal vinegar to the final rinsing water for healthy, shinning hair or make specific herbal hair rinses. For a lemon hair rinse for greasy hair, mix the grated rind of 2 lemons, 2 tablespoons of chopped lemon balm leaves and 2 ½ cups of water in a saucepan, bring to a boil, then simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and leave to infuse for 2 hours. Strain well then stir in the juice of 2 lemons, pour into bottles, seal and label.

Rosemary hair rinse is said to stimulate the scalp and help to prevent dandruff. Place 1 ½ cups of rosemary sprigs and 4 ¼ cups of water in a saucepan, bring to a boil and boil for 15 minutes. Strain, stir in 5 tablespoons of white wine vinegar and 1 tablespoon of lemon juice and store in an airtight jar.

Discover 50 Recipes & Techniques to Use to Make Your Own Natural Aromatherapy Shampoo & Conditioners.



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Rose Gardening Tips

Roses have received a bad wrap over the years for being difficult to grow and maintain. If you are thinking of gardening roses don’t let this rumor stop you. While rose bush gardening can prove to be challenging, once you get the hang of it, it really isn’t that bad.

When you first start gardening roses, you will have to choose what type of rose you wish to plant, and no, I’m not talking about the color. You will have to choose between bare-root, pre-packaged, or container-grown roses. Bare-root roses are sold in the winter and early spring. They should be planted as soon as the frosts are over and the ground is warm and workable. Pre-packaged roses are bare-root plants that are sold in a bag or box with something around the roots to retain moisture, such as sawdust. Container-grown roses are grown; you guessed it, in containers. They will be either budding or already in bloom when they become available in the early spring.



Gardening roses is not that much different than any other type of plant. The most important thing, as always, is good, healthy soil and a prime planting area. It doesn’t matter whether your roses are bare-root or you’re planting container roses, the planting methods are the same as any other shrub. Make sure the spot you choose has good drainage, gets plenty of sunlight, and will not overcrowd your other roses.

Before planting, any dead leaves, thinned or decayed shoots need to be cut off. Any damaged or very long roots also need to be trimmed. Soak bare-root roses in water for about 10-12 hours to restore moisture before planting. Always water the soil before planting as well. Make sure the hole you have dug is large enough for the root growth of the rose. Also it is a good idea to use compost or mulch. After all, roses like extra nutrients just like any other plant.

Roses need the same things as other plants; they are just a bit more high maintenance. One of the most important things to remember in rose gardening is that roses are heavy feeders and will need several fertilizer applications. Fertilizing should be started in early spring and discontinued in early fall. Make sure not to over-fertilize (fertilize should come with instructions) and water after each feeding. Roses require large amounts of water; a thorough watering twice a week should be enough.

Pruning rose bushes is an essential part to flower gardening. It increases blooms and encourages healthy plant growth. Different varieties of roses have different instructions for pruning, so you might want to read up on your rose types and see what is suggested.

The main thing to remember in gardening roses is to water, water, and water some more. One other thing about gardening roses is the amount of fertilizer and nutrients you will need to use, and the pruning that needs to be done to keep your roses under control and healthy. Even though rose gardening takes a little more time and roses are more work, they are one of the most unique and beautiful plants, and definitely worth the extra work.

Kali Winters is gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!




Learn more about the Rose Hip Recipes

Successful Gardening!
Kali S Winters

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Gardening Gift Basket


There is nothing nicer than receiving a gift relating to one’s passion. If your loved one’s passion is gardening, then show your thoughtfulness by giving a gardening gift basket that will be truly appreciated.

There are so many great garden gift ideas that the only constraint is your own budget.

If your budget is small, go for a pair of cute gardening gloves, kneepads or even a shady hat. Unique plant containers (or a watering-can) filled with a small bag of potting mix, a packet of bulbs, some gloves and a small trowel or other tool will create a great gardening gift basket. Or pick up a reasonably priced gardening hand tool at any of the numerous hardware stores.

If you feel that is too ordinary, how about a subscription to home garden magazines? A tiny bit more expensive perhaps, but it will give twelve full months of delight. Garden design books are another great idea, but make sure your recipient does not already have the one you choose. Books are often heavily discounted at Christmas time, so you may get a bargain.

On the other hand, gardening pots that contain a flowering plant is always a welcomed gift. Be sure to choose a plant that is suited to your climate. Sometimes plants are sent from tropical to temperate zones and kept in artificial conditions in the store. These tropical house plants will not do well once they are taken from their natural environment. Shrub roses are hardy and attractive and grow in many climates. Tulips do best in cooler climates.

If your budget is strong, a more expensive tool may be appropriate. A pull-trolley is easier to use than a wheelbarrow and, like some electric garden tools, is still not terribly expensive. A small power garden tool such as whipper-snippers can retail for as little as $20.00. Or if your friend has a hose but not a hose reel, then that would be a more useful gift that they would truly appreciate.

Automatic lawn mowers, electric cultivators, hedge trimmers and brush cutters are in the more expensive price range and you are the only one who can decide whether that would be an appropriate gift. However, when the recipient realizes you have given a gift that complements their passion, expensive or not, it will certainly become the best gift your friend has ever received.

Kali Winter is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs-A Beginners Guide on Herbal Gardening” is available Here!

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