Time-Table For Blanching & Sterilizing


The following time-table shows blanching time for various vegetables and fruits, as well as the sterilizing time in the hot-water bath outfit, and in equipment for sterilization by the water-seal method, the steam-pressure method and the aluminum steam-cooker method.
The time given in this table is for quart jars. Add 30 minutes for 2-quart jars and deduct5 minutes for pint jars.

Sterilizing

Vegetables

Blanching

Hot-water

Water seal

Steam pressure in lbs.

Minutes

Minutes

Minutes

5 to 10 Minutes

10 to 15 Minutes

Asparagus
Beets
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Carrots
Corn
Greens
Lima beans
Okra
Parsnips
Peppers, sweet or hot
Peppers, pimentos
Peas
Pumpkin
Salsify
Sour-crout
String beans
Squash
Tomatoes

Fruits

Apples
Apricots
Blackberries
Blueberries
Dewberries
Cherries, sweet
Cherries, sour
Currants
Fruit juices
Gooseberries
Oranges
Pears
Peaches
Plums
Pineapples
Quinces
Raspberries
Rhubarb
Strawberries
Fruits without sugar

10 to 15
5
5 to 10
5 to 10
3
5
5 to 10
15
5 to 10
5 to 10
5
5 to 10
Roast
5 to 10
See directions
5

5 to 10
See directions
To loosen skins


1-1/2
1 to 2
none
none
none
none
none
none
See directions
1 to 2
1 to 2
1-1/2
To loosen skins
none
3 to 5
1-1/2
none

none

120
90
120
120
60
90
180
120
90
120
90
120
35
180
120
90
120
120
120
22



20
16
16
16
16
16
16
16

16
12
20
16
16
30
20
16
20
16
30

90
80
90
90
40
80
120
90
120
90
80
90
25
120
90
80
90
90
90
18



12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12

12
8
12
12
12
15
12
12
15
12
20

60
60
60
60
30
60
90
60
60
60
60
60
20
60
60
60
60
60
60
15



8
10
10
10
10
10
10
10

10
6
8
10
10
10
8
10
15
10
12

40
40
40
40
20
40
60
40
40
40
40
40
15
40
40
40
40
40
40
10

The time given is for fresh, sound and firm vegetables. Increase the time of sterilization by adding one-fifth for vegetables which have been gathered over 24 hours.

The time given is for altitudes up to 1000 feet above sea level. For higher altitudes increase the time in hot-water bath 10 per cent for each additional 500 feet. For example, if the time is given as 120 minutes in the table and your location is 1500 feet above sea level, the time should be made 132 minutes.

Neither home-made nor commercial hot-water bath outfits are entirely satisfactory, however, for such localities water-seal and steam-pressure outfits are advisable, as they give higher temperatures.

Successful Gardening!
Kali S Winters


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Tips on Root Cellaring


Choose a site that usually stays dry and has good drainage in which to bury the root barrel in.

The kind of storage facility that you will need depends largely on the climate in your area.

Cone-shaped outdoor pits or root barrels are often used for storing potatoes, carrots, beets, turnips, salsify, parsnips, and cabbage. They are sometimes used for storing winter apples and pears.

The pit may be built on the ground, or in a hole 6 to 8 inches deep in a well-drained location.

Do not store vegetables and fruits in the same pit.

To ventilate large pits, place two or three stakes up through the center of the pile of vegetables or fruits to form a flue. Screen the flues at the top to ward off rodents.

Once a pit is opened, its entire contents should be removed. For these reasons it is better to construct several small pits rather than one large one.

Place a small quantity of different vegetables in each pit. Then you will only need to open one pit at a time for a variety of vegetables.

Pits should be made in a different place every year.

Pack tubers in dry compost, ancient leaves, straw, wood shavings or sand.

Place not more than three to six weeks’ supply in a single pit.

In extremely cold climates the total thickness of earth layers should be as much as 12 inches.

The air of the chamber must not be allowed to become too dry, as this will cause the produce to shrivel.

Vegetables requiring moist storage should never be left directly exposed to air.

Perforate plastic bags or liners at regular intervals to allow air circulation and prevent condensation.

Alternating layers of produce with packing materials reduces disease transmission.

Wrapping individual items of produce with newspaper aids moisture retention and reduces the possibility of cross-transfer of odors and disease.

Potatoes sprout as a result of exposure to light or warm temperatures.

While root cellaring is low-tech, you can buy a high-tech battery operated temperature and humidity gauge to help you monitor conditions in your root cellar.

Successful Gardening!
Kali S Winters


Check out All 10 Parts of Store Garden Produce Here!

Root Cellar Temperature & Humidity Chart
Ethylene Ripening Chart



How to Make a Cellar Alternative


As mentioned in Store Garden Produce #10-More on Root Cellaring, Outdoor pits can be either lined or unlined. A lined pit is one that is sealed against ground water and rodents. Figure 1. This typically consists of a 55 gallon barrel or drum or any suitable container such as metal garbage cans or barrels, leaving about 4 inches exposed at the top, that is buried semi-horizontally in the ground. Place 2-3 bushel full of mixed roots in the barrel and put the lid loosely in place to allow for air venting. Cover the barrel with about 12 inches of straw held in place by a 3-inch layer of soil. You can add more straw up to 3 feet deep, depending upon the amount of cold that must be endured by your climate.

In the unlined pit, the roots are piled on a layer of straw and the pile is covered with straw held in place by a layer of soil. The unlined pit must be dug in an area where water will not fill the pit and where rodents are not a problem.

Figure 1: An outdoor barrel storage pit

Using a 55 Gallon Barrel Drum
Root-Barrel

A storage mound (Figure 2) is similar to an unlined pit. It is used where groundwater is a problem or where only a short storage period under mild temperatures is anticipated. The vegetables are piled on a layer of straw on top of the ground. The mound then is covered with a layer of straw that is held in place by a layer of soil. The mound usually contains one or two bushels of mixed roots, so when the mounds are removed, all the produce can be taken into the house.

Storage-Mound



Check out All 10 Parts of Store Garden Produce Here!

Tips on Root Cellaring
Root Cellar Temperature & Humidity Chart
Ethylene Ripening Chart



Root Cellar Temperature-Humidity Chart


How long can certain vegetables be keep in the garden soil before the cold weather demands their removal indoors? Generally, the less susceptible they are to frost, the longer you can keep the vegetables in the ground by using a 12-18-inch covering of mulch. You might consider building a two-to-three foot wall all around the garden to keep the cold winds off the plants during this period that you are stretching their garden life. This will also keep all your mulch from blowing away. The wall can even act as a solid foundation for a temporary greenhouse frame that you could quickly erect and drape with inexpensive plastic film, to keep the plants in their garden soils even longer.

Check out Kali’s 10 Part Series on Store Garden Produce Here!

Learn How to Start a Vegetable Garden-Free Bonus e-Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali S Winters

Table 1

Fruits & Vegetables that require cold, moist conditions

Temperature (oF) Relative Humidity (%) Length of Storage
Asparagus 32-36 95 2-3 weeks
Apples 32 90 2-6 months
Beets 32 95 3-5 months
Broccoli 32 95 10-14 days
Brussels Sprouts 32 95 3-5 weeks
Cabbage, Early 32 95 3-6 weeks
Cabbage, Late 32 95 3-4 months
Cabbage, Chinese 32 95 1-2 months
Carrots, mature 32 95 4-5 months
Carrots, immature 32 95 4-6 weeks
Cauliflower 32 95 2-4 weeks
Celeriac 32 95 3-4 months
Celery 32 95 2-3 months
Collards 32 95 10-14 days
Corn, sweet 32 95 4-8 days
Endive, Escarole 32 95 2-3 weeks
Grapes 32 90 4-6 weeks
Kale 32 95 10-14 days
Leeks, green 32 95 1-3 months
Lettuce 32 95 2-3 weeks
Parsley 32 95 1-2 months
Parsnips 32 95 2-6 months
Pears 32 95 2-7 months
Peas, green 32 95 1-3 weeks
Potatoes, early 50 90 1-3 weeks
Potatoes, late 39 90 4-9 months
Radishes, spring 32 95 3-4 weeks
Radishes, winter 32 95 2-4 months
Rhubarb 32 95 2-4 weeks
Rutabagas 32 95 2-4 months
Spinach 32 95 10-14 days
 

Table 2

Vegetables that require cool, moist conditions

Temperature (oF) Relative Humidity (%) Length of Storage
Beans, snap 40-50 95 7-10 days
Cucumbers 45-50 95 10-14 days
Eggplant 45-50 90 1 week
Cantaloupe 40 90 15 days
Watermelon 40-50 80-85 2-3 weeks
Peppers, sweet 45-50 95 2-3 weeks
Potatoes, early 50 90 1-3 weeks
Potatoes, late 40 90 4-9 months
Tomatoes, green 50-70 90 1-3 weeks
Tomatoes, ripe 45-50 90 4-7 days
 

Table 3

Vegetables that require cool dry conditions.

Temperature (oF) Relative Humidity (%) Length of Storage
Garlic 32 65-70 6-7 months
Onions 32 65-70 6-7 months
Table 4

Vegetables that require warm dry conditions.

Temperature (oF) Relative Humidity (%) Length of Storage
Peppers, hot 50 60-65 6 months
Pumpkins 50-55 70-75 2-3 months
Squash, winter 50-55 50-60 2-6 months
Sweet Potato 55-60 80-85 4-6 months

Additional Tips:

  • ·Apples: I don’t foresee growing these, but they’re considered the ‘queen’ of storage fruits.
  • ·Beets: good keepers. The ‘Long Keeper’ variety is just that — a great keeper. The leaves are vitamin-rich. Can last 4 to 5 months in storage.
  • ·Brussels sprouts: might keep 4 to 5 weeks if kept in perforated plastic bags. This reminds us we might want to stock up on plastic grocery bags for this purpose.
  • ·Cabbage: if it splits, it won’t keep.
  • ·Chinese cabbage: can last up to three months. You can even replant them in a box of soil in the root cellar.
  • ·Carrots: a summer planting is best for winter keeping. They are the backbone of any food-storage plan. The roots are rich in vitamin A and they can last several months in storage. With adequate mulching, you can even keep them right in the garden row for the winter.
  • ·Cauliflower: keeps only a short time at best, two to four weeks.
  • ·Celeriac: a good keeper.
  • ·Celery: see how late you can keep this in the garden, and then maybe you can get a month or two of storage out of it.
  • ·Garlic: needs lower humidity than root vegetables. If you can find a cool, dry place, it can last seven or eight months.
  • ·Horseradish: very hard and a good keeper.
  • ·Jerusalem artichoke (sunchoke): can last several weeks in plastic bags or in damp sand.
  • ·Kale: high in vitamin content, easy to grow, extremely cold-hardy.
  • ·Kohlrabi: the leaves are good to eat. Packed in damp sand or sawdust, it can keep well into the winter.
  • ·Leeks: especially cold-hardy. Can make it through a winter outdoors if well mulched, or you can plant some in your root cellar in tubs of sand or soil.
  • ·Lettuce: has a short storage life.
  • ·Onions: seed-grown onions are especially good for storage.
  • ·Parsnips: these are perhaps the hardiest of all root vegetables. Be sure to dig them out. If you pull them, you can lose half the root. If you nick the roots with the shovel, don’t store them. Nicks and blemishes invite spoilage, and this applies to all root vegetables. For longer storage, pack them in damp sawdust. Leaves, moss, or sand will work well too. The leaves are edible.
  • ·Sweet Potatoes: the roots are vitamin-rich, and they can keep several months if stored well. Must be cured.
  • ·White Potatoes: beware of planting the kind you buy in the store — they may contain disease. Cool nights promote storage of starch, making for a longer-keeping potato, so the later-maturing ones are best for storage. Must be cured and kept in a dark spot. They can last four to six months.
  • ·Pumpkins: those that have lost their stems won’t keep well.
  • ·Winter radishes: they’ll last until February if well stored.
  • ·Rutabagas (Swedish turnip): will last two to four months in storage.
  • ·Squash: if it’s well stored, it will keep for up to six months. Cure them for 10 to 14 days. Like pumpkins, keep them dry and moderately warm.
  • ·Tomatoes: late-planted tomatoes are best for storage.
  • ·Turnips: these are among the hardiest of vegetables. In storage they might put out pale, leafy tops, good for stews.



Additional Links



Root Cellaring- Fresher Longer Food Storage


Root vegetables are named as such due to their underground plant parts that are eaten. They are easy to store and with just a few simple steps you can enjoy a bountiful harvest throughout the winter months.

  • Root crops, including potatoes, carrots, beets, turnips, rutabagas, winter radishes, kohlrabi and parsnips, adapt best at near freezing with a high relative humidity.
  • Root vegetables, such as potatoes, carrots and onions, have a long storage life. They require minimal preparation before storing.
  • Root crops store best where they are grown until there is a danger of soil freezing. Postpone harvesting by tilling the soil over the shoulders of carrots and beets to protect them from freezing. If straw and soil are piled over the row as insulation, harvest may be delayed even longer.
  • Bring most vegetables and fruits into the root cellar immediately after harvesting. Some vegetables, however, such as onions and garlic, need to be dried in the sun for a week before dry-cellar storage. Squash and pumpkins need two weeks in the sun to develop a hard rind, and they need a warm cellar. Sweet potatoes also need to be cured.
  • Freezing is fine for some fresh vegetables and destructive to others, like potatoes. However, you will want to completely avoid repeated freezing and thawing that can take place in root cellars from a warm spell to a cold spell and back to warm. You can solve this problem if you build a section of your root cellar that never freezes during these wavering spells on either side of the winter deep-freeze.
  • Store onions near freezing but with a low relative humidity to discourage neck rot.
  • Parsnips will withstand freezing. Leave part of the crop in the ground and dig in the spring when the flavor has greatly improved.
  • It is important to time your final harvest for the latest possible date. As well as planting vegetables as early as possible in the spring to be able to eat them in late spring or early summer, plant a sizable crop later than usual so that their peak arrives only in the nick of time before the killing frost. This late crop will represent your fresh supply of food throughout the winter.
  • Take into account that vegetables planted later than normal will grow slower in the cooler months of fall.
  • Kale and collards can be left in the garden long after the first fall frost. Harvest as needed until the foliage finally succumbs to cold weather. Wind protection will prolong its usefulness.
  • Celery and late cabbage may be harvested after the frost has stopped their growth. Pull celery with its roots attached. Cut cabbage and remove the loose outer leaves.
  • Plant lots of potatoes and carrots as they might last 4-6 months, but you would not want to plant too much broccoli since it only keeps for a couple weeks.
  • Leafy crops such as celery and cabbage may also be stored. Store them by themselves — they give off ethylene gas while in storage, which has proven detrimental to other vegetables.
  • Celery may be harvested and stored directly in trenches that are dug for that purpose. Pull the celery plants and pack them upright in the trench. Cover with paper, boards and soil. They will root, bleach, tenderize and develop a nutty flavor when removed in late December.
  • Many cool-weather crops taste better after frost has nipped them. Among these are parsnips, salsify (also called “oyster plant”), kale, Brussels sprouts, collards, and Chinese cabbage.
  • Potatoes grown in sandy soils last longer in storage than those grown in heavy soils.
  • Fruits and vegetables grown in soil with high potash levels store better and longer than others. Wood ashes are a good source of potash.
  • Store the ashes all winter long where the wind won’t blow them away, and any manure your animals provide can be collected at the first thaw, but don’t over-dose your garden soil.
  • Beets 4-5 months
  • Broccoli 1-2 weeks
  • Brussels Sprouts 3-5 weeks
  • Cabbage (long keeper)
  • Chinese Cabbage 1-2 months
  • Carrots 4-6 months
  • Cauliflower 2-4 weeks
  • Celery (long keeper)
  • Chives (not a root-cellar crop)
  • Collards 1-2 weeks
  • Cucumbers 2-3 weeks
  • Eggplant 1-2 weeks
  • Horse Radish (long keeper)
  • Jerusalem Artichokes 1-2 months
  • Kohlrabi (long keeper)
  • Leeks N/A
  • Onions (good keeper)
  • Parsnips 1-2 months
  • Pepper (good keeper)
  • Sweet Potatoes (long keeper)
  • Potatoes 4-6 months
  • Pumpkin (good keeper)
  • Radishes 2-3 months
  • Rutabagas 2-4 months
  • Salsify (good keeper)
  • Soybeans (long keepers)
  • Squash 4-6 months
  • Tomatoes 1-2 months
  • Turnips (long keepers)

The following are root-cellar products that are best stored in cold and very moist conditions (32-40 º F and 90-95% relative humidity): Beets, collards, broccoli, Chinese cabbage, carrots, turnips, radishes, rutabagas, parsnips, Jerusalem artichokes, celery, salsify, celeriac, parsley, Brussels sprouts, leeks, and kohlrabi.

The following products do best in the same temperatures but at a slightly reduced humidity (80-90%): Potatoes, endive, escarole, cabbage, cauliflower, quince, apples, pears, oranges, grapefruit, and grapes.

The following do best in 40-45º F cellars with a relative humidity of 85-90%: Cucumbers, cantaloupe, eggplant, tomatoes, watermelon, and sweet peppers.

Reduce the temperature and humidity of the following vegetables (35-40 º F and 60-70%): Garlic, onions and green soybeans in the pod.

The following need high temperatures and lower humidity (50-60 º F and 60-70%): Hot peppers, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, winter squash, and green tomatoes.

Very Susceptible to Frost:
Cucumbers, Eggplant, Lettuce, Squash, Sweet Peppers, Sweet Potatoes, Tomatoes, Pumpkins.
Moderately Susceptible to Frost:
Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage (young), Carrots, Cauliflower, Escarole, Garlic, Onions, Celery, Spinach, Parsley, Peas, Radishes.
Least Susceptible to Frost:
Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage (mature), Collards, Kale, Kohlrabi, Parsnips, Salsify, Turnips

For squashes, sweet potatoes and pumpkins shelves near furnace afford good storage.

For squashes, sweet potatoes and pumpkins shelves near furnace afford good storage.



Check out Kali’s 10 Part Series on Store Garden Produce Here!

Root Barrels & Storage Mounds

Learn How to Start a Vegetable or Herb Garden-Free Bonus e-Books Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali S Winters



Ethylene Ripening Chart


Determine which foods shouldn’t be stored close together. Some foods affect others, such as potatoes and apples. Unless you wrap apples individually or cover them, potatoes transfer a moldy taste to them. Apples also give off more ethylene gas than some other foods and can cause premature ripening of tomatoes, pears and peaches.

Ethylene gas has the following effects: decay (fresh produce and flower bulbs); russet spotting (leafy vegetables and eggplants); yellowing (cucumbers, broccoli and brussel sprouts); odor (garlic and onions); wilting (vegetables and cut flowers); scald and loss of crunch (apples); and rind breakdown (citrus). If you control ethylene gas levels you can help preserve freshness.


Learn more about Ethylene Gas Here!

N=None   H=High   L=Low    M=Medium   VH=Very High    VL=Very Low

Fruit or Vegetable
Temperature
C/F
Ethylene
Production
Ethylene
Sensitivity
Apple (non-chilled)
1.1 / 30
VH
H
Apple (chilled)
4.4 / 40
VH
H
Apricot
-0.5 / 31
H
H
Artichoke
0 / 32
VL
L
Asian Pear
1.1 / 34
H
H
Asparagus
2.2 / 36
VL
M
Avocado (California)
3.3 / 38
H
H
Avocado (Tropical)
10.0 / 50
H
H
Banana
14.4 / 58
M
H
Beans (Lima)
0 / 32
L
M
Beans (Snap/Green)
7.2 / 45
L
M
Belgian Endive
2.2 / 36
VL
M
Berries (Blackberry)
-0.5 / 31
L
L-Mold
Berries (Blueberry)
-0.5 / 31
L
L-Mold
Berries (Cranberry)
2.2 / 36
L
L-Mold
Berries (Currants)
-0.5 / 31
L
L-Mold
Berries (Dewberry)
-0.5 / 31
L
L-Mold
Berries (Elderberry)
-0.5 / 31
L
L-Mold
Berries (Gooseberry)
-0.5 / 31
L
L-Mold
Berries (Loganberry)
-0.5 / 31
L
L-Mold
Berries (Raspberry)
-0.5 / 31
L
L-Mold
Berries (Strawberry)
-0.5 / 31
L
L-Mold
Breadfruit
13.3 / 56
M
M
Broccoli
0 / 32
VL
H-Yellowing
Brussel Sprouts
0 / 32
VL
H
Cabbage
0 / 32
VL
H
Cantalope
4.4 / 40
H
M
Cape Gooseberry
12.2 / 54
L
L
Carrots (Topped)
0 / 32
VL
L-Bitterness
Casaba Melon
10.0 / 50
L
L
Cauliflower
0 / 32
VL
H
Celery
0 / 32
VL
M
Chard
0 / 32
VL
H
Cherimoya
12.8 / 55
VH
H
Cherry (Sour)
-0.5 / 31
VL
L-Softening
Cherry (Sweet)
-1.1 / 30
VL
L-Softening
Chicory
0 / 32
VL
H
Chinese Gooseberry
0 / 32
L
H
Collards
0 / 32
VL
M
Crenshaw Melon
10.0 / 50
H
H
Cucumbers
10.0 / 50
L
H-Yellowing
Eggplant
10.0 / 50
L
L
Endive (Escarole)
0 / 32
VL
M
Feijoa
5.0 / 41
M
L
Figs
0 / 32
M
L
Garlic
0 / 32
VL
L-Odor
Ginger
13.3 / 56
VL
L
Grapefruit
13.3 / 56
VL
M-Mold
Grapes
-1.1 / 30
VL
L-Mold
Greens (Leafy)
0 / 32
VL
H-Spotting
Guava
10 / 50
L
M
Honeydew
10 / 50
M
H
Horseradish
0 / 32
VL
L
Jack Fruit
13.3 / 56
M
M
Kale
0 / 32
VL
M
Kiwi Fruit
0 / 32
L
H
Kohlrabi
0 / 32
VL
L
Leeks
0 / 32
VL
M
Lemons
12.2 / 54
VL
M-Mold
Lettuce (Butterhead)
0 / 32
L
M-Spotting
Lettuce (Head/Iceberg)
0 / 32
VL
H-Spotting
Lime
12.2 / 54
VL
M-Mold 
Lychee
1.7 /35
M
M
Mandarine
7.2 / 45
VL
M
Mango
13.3 / 56
M
H
Mangosteen
13.3 / 56
M
H
Mineola
13.3 / 56
L
L
Mushrooms
0 / 32
L
M
Nectarine
-0.5 / 31
H
H
Okra
10.0 / 50
L
M
Olive
7.2 / 45
L
M
Onions (Dry)
0 / 32
VL
L-Odor
Onions (Green)
0 / 32
VL
M
Orange (CA,AZ)
7.2 / 45
VL
M
Orange (FL,TX)
2.2 / 36
VL
M
Papaya
12.2 / 54
H
H
Paprika
10.0 / 50
L
L
Parsnip
0 / 32
VL
L
Parsley
0 / 32
VL
H
Passion Fruit
12.2 / 54
VH
H
Peach
-0.5 / 31
H
H
Pear(Anjou,Bartlett/Bosc)
1.1 / 30
H
H
Pear (Prickley)
5.0 / 41
N
L
Peas
0 / 32
VL
M
Pepper (Bell)
10.0 / 50
L
L
Pepper (Chile)
10.0 / 50
L
L
Persian Melon
10.0 / 50
M
H
Persimmon (Fuyu)
10.0 / 50
L
H
Persimmon (Hachiya)
5.0 / 41
L
H
Pineapple
10.0 / 50
L
L
Pineapple (Guava)
5.0 / 41
M
L
Plantain
14.4 / 58
L
H
Plum/Prune
-0.5 / 31
M
H
Pomegranate
5.0 / 41
L
L
Potato (Processing)
10.0 / 50
VL
M-Sprouting
Potato (Seed)
4.4 / 40
VL
M
Potato (Table)
7.2 / 45
VL
M
Pumpkin
12.2 / 54
L
L
Quince
-0.5 / 31
L
H
Radishes
0 / 32
VL
L
Red Beet
2.8 / 37
VL
L
Rambutan
12.2 / 54
H
H
Rhubard
0 / 32
VL
L
Rutabaga
0 / 32
VL
L
Sapota
12.2 / 54
VH
H
Spinach
0 / 32
VL
H
Squash (Hard Skin)
12.2 / 54
L
L
Squash (Soft Skin)
10.0 / 50
L
M
Squash (Summer)
7.2 / 45
L
M
Squash (Zucchini)
7.2 / 45
N
N
Star Fruit
8.9 / 48
L
L
Swede (Rhutabaga)
0 / 32
VL
L
Sweet Corn
0 / 32
VL
L
Sweet Potato
13.3 / 56
VL
L
Tamarillo
0 / 32
L
M
Tangerine
7.2 / 45
VL
M
Taro Root
7.2 / 45
N
N
Tomato (Mature/Green)
13.3 / 56
VL
H
Tomato (Brkr/Lt Pink)
10.0 / 50
M
H
Tree-Tomato
3.9 / 39
H
M
Turnip (Roots)
0 / 32
VL
L
Turnip (Greens)
0 / 32
VL
H
Watercress
0 / 32
VL
H
Watermelon
10.0 / 50
L
H
Yam
13.3 / 56
VL
L