List of Perennials ~ List of Fail-Safe Plants

Gardening is more fun if you have some success to show for your time and effort. The following is a list of favorite fail-safe perennial plants:

Amsonia hubrechtli (Thread-leaf Blue Star): This former Perennial Plant of the Year is an American native with foliage that looks beautiful into late October.

Aster ‘Purple Dome’:  It likes the sun and will bloom from September until frost. Reaches 24 inches in height.

 

Autumn Bride Coral Bells (Heuchera villosa macrorrhiza):  A vigorous plant that is different from other coral bells. It reaches 20 inches, with wands of white in fall.

 

Autumn Sun Rudbeckia (Rudbeckia laciniata ‘herbsonne’): A dramatic, vigorous coneflower that reaches 5-6 feet high with bright yellow daisy-like flowers.

Baptisia Australis (Blue false indigo): A native plant that is drought-tolerant and super-adaptable.

Bigroot Geranium: This hardy perennial will grow in sun, shade, moist or dry conditions. Geranium macrorrhizum (pink) and White Ness (white) are favorites.

Black-Eyed Susan Summer Blaze (Rudbeckia ‘Summer Blaze’): This bright yellow plant thrives in full sun and attracts bees, butterflies and birds.

 

Blue Star Japanese Aster (Kalimeris incise “Blue Star’):  2 feet tall, pale blue flowers that bloom from midsummer. The deer leave it alone.

Boltonia ‘Snow Bank’: A large plant reaching 5-6 feet, covered with hundreds of white daisy like flowers in early September through October.


Carex ‘Ice Dance’: Good for the semi-shade garden, it forms low mounds (up to 12 inches) of variegated foliage; moderate rate of spread.

Coral Bells (Heuchera): You can’t go wrong with any of the scores of varieties that come in all colors, from maroon to black to peach. Most like partial shade and they are deer-resistant.

 

Day Lilies: Known as being indestructible, day lilies come in more than 100,000 varieties. Each year a variety is name the Stout Silver Medal Award Winner; any of the winners should be great. Find the listing at www.daylilies.org

 

Lady’s Mantle (Alchemilla molis): A mounded plant with chartreuses leaves and unusual texture.

 

Montrose White Calamint (Calamintha nepeta ‘Montrose white’): 18 inches high, 30 inches wide and covered with tiny white flowers that bloom for months.

Northwind Switch Grass: Tall ornamental grass grows in a tight upright form and is very hardy.

 

Perennial Forget-Me-Not (Brunnera macrophylla): Its dainty sky-blue flowers bloom for up to six weeks in spring, and its heart shaped leaves look great all season.  Super hardy; prefers partial shade.

Rozanne Geranium: This perennial’s violet flowers bloom from June to September. 18 to 20 inches tall and 24 inches wide. A former Perennial Plant of the Year.

Ruby Star Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea ‘Ruby Star’): As tall as 48 inches, this coneflower attracts birds but is deer-resistant.

Salvia ‘May Night’: An older hardy Salvia cultivar (1955) but still reliable, it provides spikes of deep indigo blue from the end of May into June. Needs well drained soil.

Shasta Daisy Becky: One of the best Shasta daisies. It blooms prolifically from July through August and reaches 30 inches or taller.

Learn How to Build an Herb Garden Here ~More on List of Perennials

Successful Gardening ~
Kali S Winters

Articles of Interest:
Plants Listed by Common Names
List of Essential Oils Blends
Essential Oil Properties

 


Back to Main Articles



Green Beans Types – Chart


Green beans are separated into two types — Pole beans vs bush beans. The varieties within these two types are listed below.

Bush varieties:

  • Burpee’s Tenderpod- stingless green pod, harvest at 50 days, has 5-inch-long green pods.
  • Contender, 50 days (green)
  • Rocdor, 53 days (yellow)
  • Cherokee Wax, 55 days (yellow)
  • Golden Wax/Improved Golden Wax/Pencil Pod Black Wax/Top Notch, 55 days (yellow, heirloom)
  • Red Swan, 55 days (red)
  • Blue Lake 274, harvest at 58 days, has green, 61/2-inch pods with white seeds.
  • Maxibel, 59 days (green fillet)
  • Improved Commodore/Bush Kentucky Wonder, 60 days (green), 1945 AAS winner
  • Roma II, harvest at 59 days, has green romano, flattened pods, 41/2 inches long.
  • Brittle Wax, harvest at 52 days, has rounded, yellow pods, 7 inches long. Royal Burgundy, harvest at 51 days, has 6-inch-long purple pods.
  • Dragon’s Tongue, 60 days (streaked)
  • Festiva, harvest at 56 days, is deep green and disease resistant.
  • Soliel, harvest at 60 days, is a high-yielding yellow.

Pole varieties:

  • Kentucky Wonder, harvest at 65 days, is a proved standard variety with heavy yields of 9-inch green pods.
  • Meraviglia di Venezia (Marvel of Venice), 54 days (yellow romano)
  • Fortex, 60 days (green fillet)
  • Kentucky Blue, 63 days (green), 1991 AAS winner
  • Old Homestead/Kentucky Wonder, 65 days (green, heirloom)
  • Rattlesnake, 73 days (streaked, heirloom)
  • Purple King, 75 days (purple)
  • Blue Lake, harvest at 60 days, has pods that are 6 inches long with white seeds.
  • Scarlet Runner Bean, harvest at 65 days, is often grown ornamentally for its scarlet flowers; pods are green and up to 12 inches long.

Snap beans require a short growing season — about 60 days of moderate temperatures from seed to first crop. They grow anywhere in the United States and are an encouraging vegetable for the inexperienced gardener. Snap beans require warm soil to germinate and should be planted on the average date of last frost.

You can plant bush beans every two weeks to extend the harvest, or you can start with bush beans and follow up with pole beans. Plant seeds an inch deep, directly in the garden. For bush beans, plant the seeds 2 inches apart in single rows or wide rows. Seeds of pole beans should be planted 4 to 6 inches apart in rows 30 to 36 inches apart. Or, plant them in inverted hills, five or six seeds to a hill, with 30 inches of space around each hill.

For pole bean varieties, set the trellis at the time of planting to avoid disturbing the roots. Keep the soil evenly moist until the beans have pushed through the ground. When seedlings are growing well, thin the plants to 4 to 6 inches apart. Thin plants by cutting excess seedlings with scissors to avoid disturbing the roots of neighboring seedlings.

Green, Wax, String, or Snap Beans: Green beans, wax beans, string beans, or snap beans are long and rounded. Most are green, but some are yellow or even purple. Heirloom varieties may still have a fibrous “string” running down their sides, but most varieties for sale today have had that inconvenience bred out of them. Steamed Green Beans are delicious with just a pat of butter and a sprinkle of salt. They are also delicious when turned into pickles.

French Green Beans: These delicate green beans are very thin. They are usually green, but yellow varieties are out there, too. Many people consider them the best of the green beans, and they are priced accordingly.

Purple string beans are simply purple version of classic green beans or wax beans. They loose their purple color when cooked, so consider them for raw recipes or lightly steam them and dip them into ice water to preserve as much of their color as possible.

Romano beans are flat and wide and flavorful. Smaller ones tend to be more tender. Large ones will have more developed bean seeds inside. They require a bit more cooking, but have more flavor. Try them as Braised Green Beans to bring out their nutty sweet essence.

Long Beans: Sometimes called yard-long beans, these beans are, in fact, a completely different family of plant from green beans. They are similar in flavor and look (except for their length) to green beans, however, and can be cooked in the same ways. Look for long beans between 12 and 18 inches long for the best flavor and tender texture.

Dry Beans:

Azuki (adzuki) – These small, dark red beans, native to the Orient, are thought to be useful in treating kidney ailments and other ills. They are loaded with nutrients and are a good source of calcium, phosphorus, potassium, iron and vitamin A.

Anasazi – Similar to pinto beans, these red and white speckled beans were originally grown by Native Americans. Try them tossed with noodles as a cold side salad or mixed with rice or quinoa as a complement to any meal.

Black turtle – These small, compact black beans are especially popular in Mexican and Southwestern cooking. Fresh cilantro, crushed garlic, and a little hot sauce are all you need to transform a pot of black beans into a distinctive side dish or quick lunch.

Black-eyed peas – Also known as cow peas, black-eyed peas are a southern staple. They are rich in potassium and phosphorus and loaded with fiber. Try them the traditional way, served with steamed greens and a splash of vinegar.

Garbanzo (chickpeas) – Garbanzo beans, or chickpeas are a staple food in the Middle East and are high in potassium, calcium, iron and vitamin A. These round, pale yellow legumes are traditionally used to make hummus – a thick mixture of chickpeas and tahini used as a dip or spread – and they are also great with grains.

Kidney Beans – These medium-sized red beans get their name from their distinctive shape. Kidney beans are a mainstay in Mexican meals, and they work equally well in soups and stews. Try mixing them with other cooked beans and tossing them in a light vinaigrette for a quick and easy, super nutritious salad.

Lentils – A member of the pea family, these small, disk-shaped seeds have been found in excavations dating from the Bronze Age. These little legumes are nutritional dynamos – they are high in calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, chlorine, sulfur and vitamin A – and are available in brown, red, and green varieties.

Lima Beans – Lima beans have a distinctive flavor and are loaded with potassium, phosphorus and vitamin A. They take a little longer to cook, but they are worth the wait. Serve them hot, tossed with fresh basil or rosemary and a little olive oil.

Mung Beans – These small, dark green beans are grown in India and the Orient. Sprouted, they are the mainstay of stir-fries and make a wonderful addition to salads. Try tossing a handful of sprouted mung beans in soups just before serving, or mix them with millet and a little ground cumin for a savory side dish.

Navy Beans – The hefty size and hearty texture of these flavorful white beans makes them the perfect bean for soups and stews. Or try mixing them with diced carrots and slivers of green pepper for a hot side dish or cold salad.

Split Peas – These flavorful members of the legume family come in both yellow and green varieties and make a wonderfully substantial soup that is easy to make and loaded with nearly any grain and are especially delicious with buckwheat or wild rice.

Pinto Beans – Along with black turtle and kidney beans, pinto beans are a favorite from the Southwest. They are rich in calcium, potassium, and phosphorus, and they make great soups.

Soybeans – The soybean has been a major source of food and oil in the Orient for thousand of years, but it was unknown in Europe and America until 1900. The soybean is the only legume that’s a complete protein by itself, and it is the most versatile bean around – you will find soybeans in a variety of forms, from dried or toasted soybeans to tofu, miso, tempeh and tamari.

In general, beans are warm-season annuals (although the roots of tropical species tend to be perennial) that grow erect (bush types) or as vines (pole or running types). Field beans are mostly the bush type and are used as stock feed. This has also become the principal use of the ancient large-seeded broad bean (called also the horse or Windsor bean), still widely grown in Europe but seldom as food for humans.

The common garden beans comprise several bush types and most of the pole types; the most often cultivated and most varied species, P. vulgata, is familiar as both types. P. vulgata is the French haricot and the Spanish frijole. String beans, snap beans, green and yellow wax beans, and some kidney beans are eaten as whole pods; several kidney beans, pinto beans, pea beans, and many other types are sold as mature dry seeds. The lima or butter beans (P. lunatus, including the former P. limensis), usually pole but sometimes bush types, have a long history; they have been found in prehistoric Peruvian graves. The sieva is a type of lima. The scarlet runner (P. multiflorus), grown in Europe for food, is mainly an ornamental vine in North America. The tepary (P. acutifolius latifolius), a small variety long grown by Indians in the SW United States, has been found better suited to hot, arid climates and is more prolific than the frijole.

Other beans are the hyacinth bean or lablab Dolichos lablab, grown in E Asia and the tropics for forage and food and cultivated in North America as an ornamental vine; the asparagus bean or yard-long bean Vigna sesquipedalis, grown in E Asia for food but often cultivated in the West as a curiosity; and the velvet bean Stizolobium, cultivated in the S United States as a forage and cover crop. The carob, the cowpea or black-eyed pea, and the chickpea or garbanzo are among the many other legumes sometimes considered beans. The sacred bean of India is the seed of the Indian lotus (of the water lily family).

Soya beans: These are rich source of proteins. They can be used in preparing delicious dishes. You can extract milk from these beans. Soya milk is healthy and tasty.

Kidney beans: These are most popular beans and widely used in North Indian cuisine. These beans are soaked over night and then cooked. These beans good for women who are going to reach their menpause state.

White beans: These are widely used in south-Indian cuisine. They are generally used with cauliflower, brinjal, reddish and tomato.

Black eye beans: They are rich in taste. These are generally prepared by soaking them in water overnight. Tomato and black eye bean combination is very tasty.

Other varieties are:

  • Pitto beans
  • Cranberry beans
  • Azuki bean
  • Lima bean
  • Black bean
  • Red bean

Caution: These beans must be cooked thoroughly to prevent toxins. That is why we need to soak them overnight and then cook on pressure for 5 to 6 whistles.

There are many different varieties of beans, Below is a list of all the different types of beans from around the world:-

1, Black-eyed peas, also known as; Field peas, cow peas, cream peas, Jerusalem peas, ton kin peas, crowed peas, and marble peas. These are small and shaped like kidneys with a black patch.

2.  Cranberry beans, these are oval with a nutty flavor.

3. Fava beans, which are long sometimes nearly 18 inches long, they are also known as broad beans, horse beans, and Windsor beans.

4. Lima beans, these were named after the capital of Peru.

5. Ford-hook Lima’s, also known as sieve beans, butter beans, civet beans, saawee beans and sugar beans.

6. Baby Lima’s.

7. Soya beans.

Most beans that people use today are canned or dried. They should be used regular as part of a healthy diet. They are high in dietry fibre and complex carbohydrates. Soya beans are the only beans that are a complete source of protein.

There are numerous types of beans, but very few were known before the discovery of the Americas. Broad (fava) beans, soy, mung, lentil and French haricot were the main beans known to the ‘Old World’, and they are still extremely important beans in much of the world.

http://www.holisticherbsinfo.com/green-beans-types-chart/



Green Bean Casseroles Recipes Here!

Store Garden Produce #6 – Storing & Freezing Green Beans Types Here!

Calories of Green Beans – Chart Here!


ReVisit Your Local Farmers Market


It’s not too late in the season to bring back those childhood memories. You all remember, you might still notice those colorful road side displays even today: “Farmers Market-Held Today ” or the “U-Pick” road side signs that beckon the traveler to come in and try their hand at finding the best produce in the field or market. A child hood experience long forgotten…but has been brought back from the past in the local weekly Farmers Market…. It still awakens a desire in most of us to “get back to the basics, our roots.”

My best experiences growing up were when my folks would pile all of us kids into the back of the station wagon and drive the back roads… searching for that next “colorful road-sign” to beckon us in. When found, we would then reap our rewards by filling buckets full of strawberries, blueberries or blackberries. To this day, my family still reminisces about those adventures.

The next week was spent in the kitchen, preserving all of our tasty finds…stuffing our mouths and bellies full of those sweet delicious berries or anticipating the enjoyment to follow through out the coming months. There was still enough leftover to be given away as holiday gifts. A long day forgotten memory in today’s world, but treasured in our hearts forever.

In these economic times, most local communities hold those ‘memories of days gone by” in their weekly Farmers Market, typically on Saturday mornings. More and more people are becoming aware of obtaining a more self-sufficient lifestyle- especially in the area of gardening. We have seen a boom in local Farmers’ markets. The USDA reports a 28 percent increase in Farmers’ markets between 2007 through 2009. That is because there is a growing concern about where our food comes from and how it is grown! People are coming back to the basics. You will also find that the prices at your local area Farmers Market have been drastically reduced since times past. Today, sweet corn goes for $2/doz. Five years ago, you could only purchase 6 ears for that price. Prices are coming down…especially in the area of produce.

I have always found a feeling of excitement at my local Farmers’ market. Typically a local band is playing music all amongst the exchange of pleasantries with the local farmers. It always gives a feeling of celebration! The festivities sometimes allow you to find an “expert or two” in some form of gardening advice offering a lecture on growing herbs, perhaps a food demonstration or a particular class on food preservation. A Farmers Market is a great leaning experience….But most importantly, you know you are purchasing fresh produce if you purchase produce that is locally grown and helping out your local community as well. Produce is also loaded with tons of vitamins, minerals, and fiber making it much easier to get your recommended daily dose of fruits and vegetables.

If you are not able to grow your own garden vegetables, herbs, and fruits…why not check out your local farmers Market for this much sought after commodity. You will find that the prices are much less expensive than in the commercial supermarkets. Besides: It is American Made— better yet—locally made! Since the product is naturally grown, they contain less preservatives…which means more overall health for your entire family. Be sure to check out your local area newspaper for listings within your community to surround yourself with nature’s plentiful bounty.



Learn more about backyard and container gardening Here!

Store Garden Produce for the Winter Months Ahead Here!

Kali S Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her teaching others how to set up and maintain beautiful amazing gardens. Check out all of Kali’s e-books Here!



When & How To Prune Rose Bushes


If not properly pruned, rose bushes can develop into a large tangled mess and produce small, inferior blooms. If you would like to grow an attractive, well shaped, sizable rose bush that produces large lovely blooms, then follow the rose gardening tips outlined below.

Pruning your rose bushes at the right time of year can be just as important as how you prune. Rose bushes go dormant during the colder months and should not be pruned until they come out of this stage. This could be as early as January in warmer climates or as late as April in colder regions. In colder climates, it is best not to prune until all traces of frost has disappeared.

Another important aspect to consider when rose bush trimming is the proper use of hand garden tools. A good set of pruning shears as well as good quality leather garden gloves, is a definite must have. The shears must be sharp, otherwise you will risk tearing your stems instead of just cutting them. A well lubricated, fine toothed, sharp, cutting saw is ideal to use on the older, much larger stems.

You never want to cut your stems straight across. Always cut at an angle between 40 to 65 degrees. Additionally, make sure that the shear’s cutting blade is on the underneath side of the stem in order to produce a clean cut. Always cut upward. This way, any injury to the plant will be on the upper part of the stem. Try to make all cuts at about one quarter inch from a strong outside bud union or eye, the eye is where the new growth stems form.

It is also a good idea to have some type of sealer or pruning paint to seal the larger cuts. Just apply the pruning sealer to the cut ends immediately after shearing. This will aid in the healing process and it will also help keep the insects out as well as eliminating any possiblity of disease.

Take special care in the amount that you prune at any given time. This will all depend upon what you are trying to accomplish and on how well established the plant is. Moderate pruning, leaving 5 or more stems of up to 24 inches in length, will produce a large bush with nice, moderately sized, blooms. Light pruning, stems 3 to 4 feet in length, will produce an even larger bush but with smaller blooms on shorter stems. Light pruning is good for new or weaker plants. Heavy pruning, 3 to 4 stems from 6 to 12 inches in length will produce the largest, showiest blooms, however if the plant is too new or weak you may end up reducing the plants life span. It is best to wait until the rose bush has matured when applying the heavy pruning method.

When pruning roots, remove all suckers. Suckers are shoots that grow from the root stock. This is different from the grafted bush. Suckers may eventually take over the plant completely and kill the bush, so it is very important that they be removed.You can recognize a sucker when you see that it is coming from below the bud union and by the different leaf form and color. Always pull the sucker off rather than cutting it as cutting will stimulate growth again. Pulling if off causes the wound to form a callous.

Additionally when plant pruning, cut out all weak, spindly and deformed stems, and if possible cut out branches growing toward the center of the bush. If stems cross each other, remove the weaker one. Proper shaping and pruning makes for a lovelier bush and allows proper air circulation which will produce a much healthier plant.



This is but a small excerpt from one of 12 of my bonus books which you will get free when you order my ebook: Holistic Herbs ~ A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening. Learn more about Herbs!

Successful Gardening!
Kali S Winters

Get a great Rose Hip Recipe?

Rose Gardening Tips-
Disease Free Roses-
Orchid Watering Tips-
Container Gardening-
Growing Orchids Indoors-



How to Start a Vegetable Garden in Your Backyard


Nowadays, it’s ideal if you can plant your own vegetables to make sure that they’re pesticide free, but a lot of people feel intimidated by the idea of vegetable garden planting, especially in the city.

Vegetable gardens are typically easier to maintain than flower gardens because vegetables are more resilient, especially in different types of weather. Flowers are typically more sensitive to changes in the weather and don’t adapt as easily. Vegetable garden planting usually demands a lot of space, however container vegetable gardens enables you to create a small home vegetable garden on your deck or patio. You can even grow indoor vegetables. It really all depends upon how much room you have available, what type of vegetables you’ll choose to plant and what you expect out of your overall vegetable gardening experience.

Planting Styles:

The more traditional vegetable garden layout is laying your plants out in straight, organized lines. Some people prefer to plant alternating rows of different types of vegetables so that when one type of vegetable is about to be harvested, the rows in between will have vegetables that are not yet in season. A drawback to this method is that the soil structure quickly becomes compromised because gardeners have to walk between rows for harvesting.

Rather than the traditional row style, a popular way of planting vegetables is building a raised vegetable garden bed. The beds have to be small enough in size so that you can reach into them and pull out the weeds or pests that might inhabit your plants. Beds can also be raised even higher off the ground so that the heat is contained longer during colder weather. It also makes for a great drainage system around the beds.

Another planting style that is popular is potager which combines vegetables with flowers and herbs and are planted in a way that is aesthetically pleasing. However, this method requires some knowledge of a vegetable companion planting chart.

For people who have constrained living spaces (especially those who live in the city), vegetables and herbs can grow in smaller plant boxes and containers. Vegetables will need a lot of sunlight and open space. If you want to reap a lot of vegetables, you should invest in bigger real estate.

Preparing the soil is a very important aspect of vegetable garden planting. It doesn’t matter whether you plan raised vegetable garden beds in a small plot of land or you choose container vegetable gardens on your patio or deck. Soil preparation is an essential key. Soil can be categorized as sandy or clay-like, with silt being a fine mixture of both sand and clay. Clay particles in sand help retain water longer as well as make the soil absorb water faster. Sandy particles in soil makes the water flow through it easily and lets the air in so that the roots can breathe.

The best way to prepare the soil for your vegetable garden planting is to try to make the soil a good balance between clay, silt, and sand. Ideally, it should be 40% silt, 40% sand, and 20% clay. To test it, you can scoop up the soil using your hand and form it into a ball. The soil should be sticky enough that it retains it’s shape but yet you don’t want it to easily crumble when you poke it with your finger.

Vegetable garden planting requires a lot of patience. You have to find what works for you, and experiment on getting the right type of soil for the right type of vegetables. All the hard work will be worth it, though, once you experience eating something that grew from a garden that you planted yourself.



Kali Winters is gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!

Learn more about Vegetable Gardening!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Rotating Vegetable Crops-
Vegetables and Their Vitamins-
Vegetable Gardens for Dummies-
Indoor Vegetable Gardening-
Fall Vegetable Gardening-



Home Garden Supply


Because gardening has evolved into such a popular activity, home garden supply products are not hard to come by. You can buy outdoor garden decorations in various stores or nurseries, or you can order your home garden supply online or from catalogs. A gardeners products can range from equipment too fertilizer or to the actual plant itself.

You will obviously need the basic home garden supply no matter what you are planting, such as a hoe, spade, and maybe even a shovel. You must have watering supplies, like a water hose and perhaps a sprinkler. Other possibilities include a spade, a pot (if you are container gardening), and a pair of gloves for comfort, some secuturs, or a rake. When first starting a garden you will definitely want some type of mulch or potting soil to get your soil ready. There are a few types of potting soil to choose from, including organic potting mix, seed starting potting mix, cactus potting mix, and root development potting mix, just to name a few.

Once you have your garden planted, you must have gardeners products so that you can add nutrients to the soil to ensure a healthy plant life. Miracle-Gro is one of the most popular growing enhancements for plants. There are many different types of Miracle-Gro to choose from and what type you choose will depend on what you are trying to grow. You will also want to add fertilizer, such as 10-20-10 or triple 13, depending upon the requirements of your soil.

If you are growing vegetables or herbs, you may need select garden products rather than the regular flower garden products. If you are growing tomatoes you will need a tomato cage and ties to protect the plants against the wind. Many plants, mostly vines, are designed to grow on structures and you will have to have a fence or trellis of some sort to hold it’s fruits.

Gardeners products are not limited to just the gardening necessities; they can also come in the form of outdoor garden decorations. There are decorative flower pots, sundials, plastic figurines, stones or bricks for a pathway or looks, and even lawn furniture. Decorative garden accessories will add to the charm and uniqueness of your garden and are an excellent way to give it a personal flair.

The winter months will bring a whole new set of home garden ideas to store shelves. When the frost hits, the prime place to put your plants are in a greenhouse. However, if you do not have a greenhouse for whatever reason, a tarp of some sort can be used to cover plants up at night. You also might need a light source, like a heat lamp, to keep plants warm and to provide them with extra light.

New and upgraded gardening products are always popping up on the market. It seems like every day there is some home garden supply necessity that claims to be bigger and better than the last. While many gardeners products are not a necessity, they sure make the job a lot easier and more enjoyable.




Kali Winters is gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!

All About Greenhouses!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles That Might Be of Interest:

The Best Tools for Gardening-
Modern Gardening Power Tools-
The Best Gloves for Gardening-
Indoor Vegetable Gardening-



Selling at a Farmer’s Markets


Usually the main motivation for planting a fruit tree is just the joy of maintaining a tree and eating the delicious fruit that comes from it. However, in my personal experience it is possible to go on a quite lucrative venture with fruit trees by operating a fruit stand or participating in a farmer’s market.

When I moved to Florida, I was slightly depressed at the fact that I had just left behind years and years of hard work to get my lawn to the point it was. However, I was able to channel this depression into the desire to get a new and more beautiful garden and lawn setup going. The house I moved into was nice, but the previous owner obviously had no gardening prowess. The lawn was barren of any features besides grass. Lots and lots of grass.

I decided that since I was now in a new climate that I had never experienced before, I would grow some trees that I didn’t have the opportunity to grow before. I decided to do the truly Floridian thing to do, and get a few orange trees. It was a lot easier than I had imagined. I’ve had some rather disastrous experiences with planting trees in the past, and planting the orange trees was no problem at all. I decided to go with Valencia oranges, just because they are the most popular orange to grow and almost everyone is able to grow them successfully.

After I picked out what type of orange I wanted, I decided to get three trees. It took me about 3 days to dig all the necessary holes and install the trees. It was a flawless operation, and I truly felt like an expert. The trees grew healthy and straight, and produced fruit at the time of year they were expected to.

For the three or four years, my orange trees didn’t produce very much fruit. Sure I never ran out of oranges for my own personal usage, and I drank almost nothing but orange juice, but I didn’t have the ludicrous amount that you might expect from 3 trees. I wouldn’t say I was disappointed with my trees. I was happy to be getting any fruit at all. But I had heard of people getting thousands and thousands of oranges from several trees, and I was slightly baffled as to why I wasn’t so fortunate.

About a year after that, my orange trees really took off. I walked outside one day to see about 5 times as many oranges as I had grown in any previous seasons. I thought I was seeing things, but they all stuck around. I harvested so many oranges that year, I hardly even knew what to do with all of them. That was when my neighbor suggested to me that I sell at a farmer’s market. I found out the time that they go on, and rented a spot for my truck (some farmers markets allow you to come and sell for free, but mine charged rent just to park my truck).

Within the first day at the farmer’s market, I had made back all the money I spent on the original trees. My oranges were truly a hit, and I was getting more customers than any of the other participants. After that week, I didn’t miss a day at the farmer’s market. It wasn’t enough money to live off of, but it was a good amount for just selling some oranges. Besides, what else would I have done with them? I certainly couldn’t have eaten them all by myself. So if you have any excess fruit, you should never throw it away or try to eat it all by yourself. Take it to the farmer’s market and try to get some extra cash for your gardening labor. If your products are delicious, you might just be a hit with the consumers.




Kali Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!

Your Guide to Growing Big Juicy Tomatoes!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

How to Prevent Small Fruits-
Rotating Vegetable Crops-
Harvesting and Drying Herbs-
Gardening Gift Basket-



How to Safely Spray Pesticide


If you want to protect your fruit tree from pests during the summer, this is almost impossible to accomplish without the use of pesticides or chemicals. This might scare some people into thinking that the actual fruits will contain traces of the chemicals. If you do things correctly, you can get rid of all the pests and not infect the actual tree. If you’re going to be spraying chemicals, you most likely will be using either a handheld pump or a hose-end sprayer.

If you’re using the pump sprayers, you will be able to more accurately determine the mixing of the chemicals. Unfortunately, you won’t be able to spray it very far. Usually it won’t reach the tops of trees. This can be achieved with the hose end sprayers, but getting the correct mix of chemicals is quite a challenge. It all depends on your water pressure to get the correct mixture of chemicals, but water pressure is not constant. One day it might be lower, in which case your chemical content would be higher. The types of materials you buy for hose application are generally in an extremely strong form. They need to be severely diluted before they are weak enough to apply.

When you are mixing the chemicals for spraying, you need to follow the directions exactly. You are dealing with dangerous chemicals, so its best to do exactly what the professionals recommend and wear the proper protective gear. When you’re dealing with chemicals like this, you should always wear rubber gloves. Use the exact portions indicated on the label. Estimation won’t work in this case, and you could end up killing your tree or not killing any bugs. You should usually start by putting in the proper amount of pesticide, and then top it off with all the water.

Now comes the spraying. The goal is to spray the same amount over all the areas. You still don’t want to spray so much that enough builds up to drip off of the leaves. Usually you will want to get a ladder so that you can get within spraying distance of all the portions of the tree. Apply the pesticide in even, full sweeps as to hit every piece. Never go over the same part twice, because that is when you start to drip.

If you’re dealing with a large and well developed tree, you should stand on a ladder under the base of the trunk. Spray all segments from the inside towards the outside. After you are done spraying the outer canopy, you’re ready to get out from under there and work on the rest. Once you are done cleaning, be sure to fully and thoroughly clean off every bit of equipment you used, including your clothes. Don’t include the clothes you wore while spraying in the rest of your family’s laundry.

While you’re spraying for pests, the main thing to keep in mind is to avoid dripping onto the ground. When this happens, the pesticides will be absorbed by the roots of the tree and be transported to the actual fruits on the trees. As long as the pesticides stay on the outside and you wash your fruit thoroughly before you eat it, you will have nothing to worry about as far as being poisoned goes.




Kali Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain wonderfully, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here! Learn more about Organic Gardening!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Preventing Diseases in Fruit Trees-
Caring Properly for Your Fruit Tree-
Organic Tips-



Basics of Vegetable Garden Planting


Not a lot of people try vegetable garden planting these days, especially in the city. With the busy lifestyle, constrained spaces, and pollution, it seems inconceivable that a vegetable garden would survive. The fact is, you can actually grow vegetables even if you are smack dab in the middle of a busy city. It’s only important that you get the basics of vegetable garden planting right.

First things first. Soil preparation. This is the most basic ingredient that any new gardener will have to learn. Whether you plan on indoor vegetable gardening or start raised vegetable garden beds in your own backyard, soil preparation plays an important role in whether your vegetable garden will survive or not.

There are three types of soil that you need to be familiar with; sand, clay and silt. Sandy soil is loose and helps the roots of the plants to breathe because it lets the air pass through easily. Clay soil absorbs water faster and keeps it inside longer. A soil composition that has more clay particles in it would be ideal for places that are too hot and the soil dries up quickly. Silt is a fine mixture of sand and clay particles combined.

When preparing the soil for your vegetable garden, dig up the soil and break up the clumps. Take out the rocks, roots, and weeds while you’re at it. Check if you have just the right mixture of sand, silt, and clay before you begin vegetable garden planting. Ideally, silt and sand should both be 40%, and clay should just be 20%. This is to make sure that the water isn’t trapped inside too long that the roots end up choking. Also, if the water is trapped too long inside the soil, the roots will rot. One good way to test whether the composition of your soil is good is by scooping out a handful and forming a ball with it. The soil should hold the shape of a ball without too much difficulty. If the soil cannot hold the shape, you might have too much silt or sand in the mixture. If the soil holds the shape but does not crumble easily when you poke it, it might have too much clay in it which you will need to balance it out a bit by adding additional silt or sand.

Once you have finished cultivating the soil where you want to plant your vegetables, choose your vegetables. Keep in mind that some vegetables don’t grow well when you plant them too close to certain other types of vegetables. These are known as companion vegetables. Potatoes, for example, shouldn’t be planted too close to squash or tomatoes because it inhibits their growth. They can be planted in the same garden, just don’t plant them beside each other.

After you have decided on the type of vegetables you want and have planted them into the cultivated soil, you will need to learn how to water them properly. Vegetables need to be watered consistently. When planting vegetable gardens in larger spaces, you may want to consider using a soaker hose. A soaker hose has a lot of holes running along its body that waters your garden by letting the water seep through its holes.

Vegetable garden planting does require manual labor (yes, actual work), and a lot of patience. The rewards are very well worth it, though. Especially for people who are concerned about their health. Growing your own vegetables insures that there’s the least amount of poisonous (and in the long run, carcinogenic) particulates in it as possible.




Kali Winters is gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!

Your Guide to Growing Big Juicy Tomatoes!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Vegetable Gardens For Stress Relief-
Vegetables and Their Vitamins-
Home Garden Supply-




Vegetable Gardens for Stress Relief


More than reducing the sum of money allocated for food, there is another very beneficial effect to vegetable garden planting that will really give your health a tremendous boost: it’s called stress relief.

We all know how stress wreaks havoc to our overall health. Aside from the more obvious fact that stress takes joy and serenity out of our lives, it is also the root of many illnesses known to man. The negative effects of stress in our lives can and will bring numerous problems such as: heart diseases, depression, migraines, eating disorders–just to name a few.

Having your own backyard vegetable garden is an easy and highly accessible method of stress relief. Since a vegetable garden is easier to look after than one with ornamental plants, you know that working on your garden simply will not create additional stress.

The weekends are a perfect time to unwind and make up for those stressful hours spent at the workplace during the week. Different people have different ways of getting rid of stress. Just imagine if you had a vegetable garden in your backyard; just don your gardening attire, step out into your yard and you will immediately be in touch with nature, all the while putting behind the stresses of life. Now compare that to a weekend at the beach. The long hours of travel, heavy traffic, and the additional expense for gas and accommodations, will only add to your already stressful life.

Relishing the sunlight

Getting enough sunlight while vegetable garden planting alone will already significantly improve your mood. It’s also a great and productive way to obtain enough natural vitamin D, which is necessary for proper absorption of calcium in your body. Try to picture some of the happiest moments of your childhood; it is probably without a doubt that most of them were spent under the nourishing radiance of the sun.

Hours spent at the office means exposure to unnatural light. Not that it is bad to be exposed to light coming from incandescent bulbs, but the lack of being exposed to natural light of the sun is. For sure those skyscrapers are blocking out the sunlight from directly hitting your skin even as you walk to work in the morning.

Attending to the needs of your vegetable garden in the backyard is a great opportunity to get plenty of sunlight. However, it is best that you avoid gardening between 11 am to 3 pm as the sun will most likely cause irreversible skin damage or cancer.

Surrounded with life

Being surrounded with plants alone is both invigorating and encouraging. Days and days spent indoors and at the workplace prevent us from getting in touch with nature, therefore we tend to have limited means to appreciate everything that’s grand and beautiful in life. Picture yourself being surrounded with plants that teem with life and growth, and their edible parts improve the appetite and nourish the body with essential vitamins and minerals.

Having your own little piece of nature can help you get rid of stress. The sight of your vegetable garden alone gets rid of stress by giving you a rewarding feeling, knowing you raised those healthy plants with your very own hands. Raking, digging, weeding, pruning and harvesting – all these activities you preformed while vegetable garden planting provided you with a constructive outlet for all the tensions that the body amassed during a week of stressful work.

Kali Winters is gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here! There you will find one of 12 free bonus books on Building a Backyard Vegetable Garden….with instructions and pictures to help! Find out more about Holistic Health~Alternative Medicine!




Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Vegetables and Their Vitamins-
Indoor Vegetable Gardening-
Indoor Hydroponic Gardening-
Understanding Container Gardening-



How To Start a Garden in Your Backyard


In periods of financial difficulty, vegetable garden planting becomes a viable option that achieves two things: it helps the family reduce expenses related to buying food, and it offers the opportunity to sell the surplus to friends and neighbors. Starting a vegetable garden is not particularly difficult, as long as you put enough time, thought and effort into it.

The first decision you have to make is the location of the vegetable garden itself. You must place it in an area where it will be exposed to at least 6 hours of sunlight per day. The location must also be accessible to the water source. It must be near enough for short trips if you are carrying heavy pails of water, or it must be close enough to a hose connection either inside or outside your home.

Also, check if the area has soil conducive for growing plants. It must have good drainage, and must be free of silt, stones, and other hard objects. Last, the location of your vegetable garden must be somewhere accessible, so that you can frequently check for pests and weeds when you walk by.

Included in your vegetable garden layout should be the type of plants and how many of each you intend to grow. This will help determine the size of the plot you will actually need. Afterwards, make a list of all the plants you want to grow. This decision cannot be completely random, especially since the yield of the garden will be what you consume as a family. Make sure to plant vegetables that your family would love to eat, or vegetables that you often use for cooking. This way, you are ensured of a direct benefit from your vegetable garden planting.

Make a plan for the arrangement of the vegetable plants in the garden as well. Remember, you must think about rotating vegetable crops. The first consideration is the frequency of yield. Perennial plants, or those that yield vegetables constantly throughout the season, must be placed at the back where they will be undisturbed by whatever gardening activities you have set for the rest of the garden. Put the crops that produce early together. These crops include radishes, spinach, carrots, beets, and the like. Make some space for replanting successively. Once these crops have seen their yield, you can then rotate your crops and plant the vegetables that are able to produce late into the season.

The last consideration for your vegetable garden layout is the reality that there are plants that cannot grow beside other plants. They are known as companion vegetables. For instance, there are plants that enhance the growth of others when planted together; there are those that inhibit the growth of others as well. It is important to take into consideration which crops inhibit the growth of others. For instance, potatoes are capable of inhibiting the growth of both squash and tomato plants. Broccoli inhibits tomato growth. Beans, on the other hand, inhibit the growth of onions. Carrots also inhibit the growth of dill plants. This does not stop you from planting all these plants in the garden. This only serves as a reminder of which plants you should separate from the others when making your vegetable garden plans.

Kali Winters is gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here! There you will find one of 12 free bonus books on Starting a Vegetable Garden….with instructions and pictures to help!  Find out more about Herbs!

Successful Gardening!



Other Articles of Interest:

Backyard Vegetable Garden Ideas-
Vegetable Garden Layout-
Small Garden Design Basics-
Basic Tools for Gardening-



Backyard Vegetable Garden Ideas


The structure of your vegetable garden does not have to be entirely functional but it should look and feel good. Building some decorative arches and some tomato cages will not only make your garden look good but it will also help it produce more crops. After all, there is more to vegetable garden planting than just cultivating a spot of land.

Function Over Form

The most well known form of garden structures are those that are built to sustain plants, give them room to climb and enable the plant to hold up under the weight of its fruits.

Building cages and poles allows you to have a vertical garden which boosts your produce per square foot since you’ll have more space to plant in the ground.

Vegetables like cucumbers, peas, peppers and eggplants need lots of garden support. Carrying these vegetables above ground will not only produce better crops it also protects it from insects found in the soil. Plus, the fruits will be less likely to rot if planted in this manner. Building other support structures like stakes and cages will help in making your plants grow stronger and taller.

Choose Your Structure

If you plan to shop for items for your garden online or in a garden store, you’ll notice how many choices there are when it comes to garden structures. A great online garden resource is a company called Garden Supply Company. Not only do they have a mail-order catalogue, they make trellises for plants like cucumbers that serve as a shade to neighboring plants, tomato cages, spiral supports, bean towers, maypoles and others.

Garden structures may vary especially in terms of form and function because they not only are very supportive of plants it also makes your garden look good. The best kind of garden is not only beautiful, but also enhances the health of the vegetables planted within.

Form over Function

There are so many options when it comes to building your vegetable garden especially if your purpose is purely aesthetic. You can build ornaments like arches, trellises or archways to beautify your garden. You can even build walls or doorways to surround your garden for more visual appeal.

For gardens like these, you can decorate them with plants aside from vegetables. You can plant beautiful flowers to cover your trellis but choose flowers that are sun friendly and attract helpful insects.

An example is trumpet flowers, which are not only beautiful but they attract bees for your vegetable garden. Since you also want to attract helpful creatures, you can build a bird bath or a bird house in your garden. If you prefer organic gardening, the birds can certainly help eliminate pests.

As long as you keep your garden attractive to birds and other helpful insects, they will spend a lot of time in your garden and repay you by eating away harmful pests.

Supporting Your Plants

Building plant supports are essential garden structures which is why it’s necessary to use them in the proper way to maximize results. This does not mean building stakes or cages in the ground and just leaving the plant to grow on its own.

There are other materials like plant ties, jute cords or twines which you can use to tie up your plants to the cages or poles– but don’t tie them too tight.

Another great support when it comes to vegetable garden planting are stakes. Make sure to drive them properly into the ground and space them a little further from your main plant to avoid hitting its roots.

Kali Winters is gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!

Building A Vegetable Garden?
Get Your Free Bonus Book Here!




Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Vegetable Garden Plans-
How to Start a Vegetable Garden in Your Backyard-
Vegetable Gardens for Stress Relief-
Vegetable Garden Layout-



Vegetables and Their Vitamins


Instead of setting up a swimming pool or a Zen garden in your backyard, why not plant vegetables instead? Vegetable garden planting is a great way to spend quiet time de-stressing while getting in touch with nature. Having a steady supply of vegetables will also lessen food expenses and improve the health of your loved ones.

Money-saving strategy

It’s not easy to ignore the soaring prices of food these days, especially vegetables and herbs. Although your backyard may be small and your garden may not provide all that you need, it will have a dramatic effect in reducing your overall food bill. Imagine not having to run to the grocery store to buy some of the ingredients for everyday cooking. Some of the most common vegetables and herbs that you need are already right there in your very own backyard. Depending upon the kind of vegetables and herbs you plant and your methods of preserving them, the economical benefits you get from your backyard garden will be felt all year round.

You may also think that your kids will eat less each time you serve them vegetables. It is obvious that kids would prefer to eat burgers, hotdogs and pizza. However, there are several cookbooks available in the marketplace that will show you a variety of vegetable meals to prepare that are appetizing even for the kids. When what you serve on the table does not look and taste boring, your kids will surely dig it.

More nutritious meals

With a variety of backyard vegetables ready to be picked, you will find it more pleasant to cook and serve vegetable dishes to your whole family. This means that everybody will get to enjoy the tremendous amount of health benefits by eating fresh produce. Vegetables are packed with tons of nutrients. Aside from the fact that they are low in fat and calories, and contain no cholesterol, you will also get a steady source of the following:

Dietary fiber – This is important for normal bowel movement and good for your entire digestive tract. Dietary fiber is also known to reduce the amount of bad cholesterol in the body, lower the risk of heart disease, as well as fight off certain forms of cancers. If you are on a diet, you will also feel fuller faster. Some vegetables that are rich in dietary fiber are peas, carrots, cabbage and spinach.

Potassium – This is a necessity for keeping blood pressure at normal levels. It is also important in keeping the brain, muscles and other tissues in the body functioning properly. Vegetables that are loaded with potassium include potatoes, squash, tomatoes, eggplant and celery.

Vitamins A, B and C – Vitamin A is great for the eyes and skin. Vitamin C is necessary to maintain healthy connective tissues and is known to boost the immune system. Vitamin B is important for extracting the energy in the carbohydrates in several food sources. Carrots, asparagus, broccoli and green peppers are rich in Vitamin A. Broccoli, peas and beans are a great source of vitamin B. Your dose of vitamin C is supplied by red cabbage, kale, parsley and turnip.

Other vegetables and their vitamins worth mentioning include calcium, phosphorous, sodium, magnesium, iron, niacin, foliate, zinc and manganese.

Save money and help your kids stay in the pink of health by vegetable garden planting. You will get that sense of pride each time your family enjoys the meal on the table, whose vegetable ingredients you cultivated yourself right in your own backyard.

Kali Winters is gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!



Learn more about Natural Herbal Cures!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Medical Home Remedies – Kali’s Top 5 Healing Herbs-
Landscape Gardening-
Natural Home Herbal Remedies-
Rotating Vegetable Crops-



Vegetable Gardens for Dummies


Nowadays, it’s ideal if you can plant your own vegetables to make sure that they’re pesticide free, but a lot of people feel intimidated by the idea of vegetable garden planting, especially in the city.

Vegetable gardens are typically easier to maintain than flower gardens because vegetables are more resilient, especially in different types of weather. Flowers are typically more sensitive to changes in the weather and don’t adapt as easily. Vegetable garden planting usually demands a lot of space, however container vegetable gardens enables you to create a small home vegetable garden on your deck or patio. You can even grow indoor vegetables. It really all depends upon how much room you have available, what type of vegetables you’ll choose to plant and what you expect out of your vegetable garden.

Planting Styles: The more traditional vegetable garden layout is laying your plants out in straight, organized lines. Some people prefer to plant alternating rows of different types of vegetables so that when one type of vegetable is about to be harvested, the rows in between will have vegetables that are not yet in season. A drawback to this method is that the soil structure quickly becomes compromised because gardeners have to walk between rows for harvesting.

Rather than the traditional row style, a popular way of planting vegetables is building raised vegetable garden beds. The beds have to be small enough in size so that you can reach into them and pull out the weeds or pests that might inhabit your plants. Beds can also be raised even higher off the ground so that the heat will be contained longer during colder weather. It also makes for a great drainage system around the beds.

Another planting style that is popular is potager which combines vegetables with flowers and herbs and are planted in a way that is aesthetically pleasing. However, this method requires some knowledge of a vegetable companion planting chart.

For people who have constrained living spaces (especially those who live in the city), vegetables and herbs can grow in smaller plant boxes and containers. Vegetables will need a lot of sunlight and open space. If you want to reap a lot of vegetables, you should invest in bigger real estate.

Preparing the soil is a very important aspect of vegetable garden planting. It doesn’t matter whether you plan a raised bed vegetable garden in a small plot of land or container vegetable gardens. Soil preparation is an essential step. Soil can be categorized as sandy or clay-like, with silt being a fine mixture of both sand and clay. Clay particles in sand help retain water longer as well as make the soil absorb water faster. Sandy particles in soil makes the water flow through it easily and lets the air in so that the roots can breathe.

The best way to go when preparing the soil for your vegetable garden is to try to make the soil become a good balance of clay, silt, and sand. Ideally, it should be 40% silt, 40% sand, and 20% clay. To test it, you can scoop up soil and form it into a ball using your hand. The soil should be sticky enough that it retains it’s shape but you don’t want it to crumble easily when you poke it.

Vegetable garden planting requires a lot of patience. You have to find what works for you, and experiment on getting the right type of soil for the right type of vegetables. All the hard work will be worth it, though, once you experience eating something that grew from a garden that you planted yourself.

Kali Winters is gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here! There you will find one of 12 free bonus books on Building a Backyard Vegetable Garden….with instructions and pictures to help!




Learn more about Herbal Medicine For Children

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

More on Backyard Vegetable Gardens-
Basics of Vegetable Garden Planting-
Fall Vegetable Gardening-
Gardening Gloves-
Basic Tools for Gardening-



Vegetable Garden Layout


Your vegetable garden layout will depend upon what vegetables you intend to grow, the planting space available and if you would like to opt for companion planting. Here are some helpful tips on how to layout your own garden and start planting vegetables.

Sit Down and Plan

Before choosing a layout you need to decide on what type of vegetables you would like to grow and where you would like to plant them. Here are some other factors you need to consider for your vegetable garden layout:

* Garden Space * Amount of Light in the Space * Drainage System * Soil Amendments * Type of Vegetable * Additional Space (if needed)

You should also think about whether you want to grow one type of vegetable like lettuce and tomatoes or if you want one type of vegetable with different varieties, such as romaine lettuce or iceberg lettuce. Research the amount of light and space each vegetable requires for optimal growth.

Make a list of vegetables you want to plant and find out the plants requirements, then compare it with the garden space you have available. This should give you an indication of where you are able to plant each particular vegetable in your allotted space.

Choose your Garden Layout

There are three basic vegetable garden layouts: rows, beds and the “potager” style.

The more traditional layout style consists of planting seeds in a row. This type of arraignment would either mean planting one type of seed in a row or different seeds in a row. Regardless, the style is in a row formation.

A similar layout and a more popular approach is the raised vegetable garden beds. This bed type is similar to the rows style but on a smaller scale. The layout allows access to the plant beds from all sides. The beds are raised off the ground with some being as high as 3 feet. This is particularly convenient to avoid stepping on the beds which tends to pack down the soil, making it difficult to dig and aerate in the spring or fall. Plant beds are great ways to maximize a garden space and you can even use raised beds for easier gardening.

The most decorative style of layout is called the “potager” which means kitchen garden in French. This layout is described as geometric which allows you to layout your garden in circles or arrange plants by color or even food type. Gardens like these often contain vegetables, flowers and herbs planted together.

Companion Vegetable Planting

The idea behind companion planting involves planting different kinds of plants together so that they help each other grow. A perfect example of this is planting beans, corn and squash together which were commonly done by Native Americans. While the corn gives the beans a place to climb, the beans gives its three companions nutrients in the soil and the squash serves as a shade to the roots of the plants beside it. This not only prevents weeds from growing, it also saves up on water.

Other great companion vegetables are onions, which scares slugs and aphids away, tomatoes, which grow well with carrots and basil, which improves the taste of tomatoes. Another example is horseradish and potatoes which when planted together give your potatoes protection from disease.

Companion vegetable planting is certainly worth considering when vegetable garden planting. My new book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners guide to Herbal Gardening,” has a complete vegetable companion chart. You will get the chart for free along with 12 other bonus books when you order my book Here!




Learn more aboutTips To Look For a Safe Herbal Medicine!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Small Garden Design Basics-
Home Garden Tips-
Design Japanese Garden-



Small Garden Design Basics


The thing to remember while planting backyard garden is to start small. In raised vegetable garden beds, about 25 or 30 feet square, is just enough room for about 30 plants. This will give you a chance to try out your green thumb and if you find that you enjoy your small garden design you can always expand and increase your plantings later on.

The next thing you will want to do is choose a site. Gardening must be done in an area that gets at least six hours of sunlight. Try and stay away from large trees that will take your plants water and nutrients, and at least three feet from any fences or buildings. In hot climates it is a good idea to choose a place that will have shade from a part of the intense afternoon sun. It is possible to have a healthy garden with even ten to twelve hours of sunlight, but the type of plants must be adaptable. While soil can always be improved, a site with good soil is a plus. Avoid areas that have rocky soil, steep slopes, or areas where water stands.

Now comes the fun part: start digging. Gardening is not a clean hobby; you’re going to have to get some dirt under your nails. First remove the rocks, debris, and any grass and weeds then dig the spot up about one foot deep. Level up the dirt and add compost or minerals if the needed. If your soil is too acidic, add lime; if it is too sandy, add peat moss. Plants will thrive in neutral to acidic soil with a little added fertilizer.

If you buy seeds then plant them according to the directions. If picking plants, choose ones with green, healthy looking leaves and stems and healthy roots. Put the smaller plants towards the front of the bed and larger ones in the back. The key to a successful beginning in gardening is planting at the right time. Make sure and wait until the frosts are over before planting. If you are planting seeds the package will usually tell you exactly when you can plant them to achieve maximum growth.

Once you have started and gotten into gardening, making sure your plants receive enough water is essential to their growth. Hand watering works well if you only have a few plants. Other options include sprinklers or sprinkler hoses. Watering is more effective during the cooler parts of the day. The type of plant will depend on how much water is needed, but most require about an inch per week. During the hottest periods plants will be need watering about three times per week.

One of the most helpful things to add to a garden is mulch or compost. Just a few inches of organic mulch will improve fertility and help the soil hold moisture. Wood chips, grass clippings, leaves, manure, and pine needles are all things that can be used as mulch.

Kali Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!



Building A Vegetable Garden?
Get Your Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Growing Herbs in Pots-
Gardening Gift Baskets-
Indoor Hydroponic Gardening-
Indoor Garden Design-



Gardeners Gloves


One of the best things about gardening is felling warm, moist dirt in your bare hands, but you will often end up with blistered, chapped, and scraped skin. The solution to this problem is gardening gloves. The more time you spend getting down and dirty in the garden, the more you need gardening gloves. Gardening gloves will be able to ease some of the pain you would otherwise be subject to, letting you spend even more time playing in the dirt.

There are hundreds of different types of gloves on the market, and the kind of gardening glove you buy depends on the way you garden. Some gloves offer protection against specific substances or things, for example, leather gloves are not the best for working with chemicals or water. Many gardening gloves are specialized for pruning thorns, refilling gasoline tanks, or using a chain saw, while others are for general tasks such as raking, digging, and weeding.

After choosing the type of gardening glove you need, you must make sure and pick out the perfect fit. Gloves that are too big have a tendency to slip off while gloves that are too small could cause aches and cramps. Any glove that doesn’t fit could defeat the whole purpose of wearing gloves and cause blistering. To find a glove with the best fit possible, try the gloves on both hands, make a fist, and imitate the movements you make when gardening. If there is no pinching or slipping and the glove is comfortable then you have found your match.

Gardening gloves can be bought in many places and are produced by many companies, causing them all to have a different quality and price. Most gloves can be washed in cool water and then air dried. There are many different types of gloves you can purchase to satisfy your varying needs, such as cotton and cotton-polyester for general-purpose chores. These are among the most popular gloves and are perfect for light chores in cool and dry weather. Leather gloves can also be used for general chores but are heavier than cotton and polyester. Chemical resistant gloves will help protect your hands against oils, acids, herbicides, pesticides, and many other chemicals. Grip enhancing gloves are designed with rubber dots for extra gripping power. Cut and puncture resistant gloves are designed to offer extra protection against sharp edges

If you are the type person that only wears gloves as an optional luxury for various tasks, you should think seriously for using specialized gardening gloves for many of the activities you will be doing outside. There is really no reason not to wear gardening gloves; they protect your hands from the elements and don’t ever cost all that much.

Kali Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!




Learn about Rotating Crops

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Modern Gardening Power Tools-
The Best Tools for Gardening-
Pruning-
Basic Tools for Gardening-
Home Garden Supply-
The Best Home Garden Magazines-



Home Garden Tips


Home garden tips are not that hard to come by. In fact, you can get a gardeners advice from another gardener, in a gardeners catalogue, gardeners books, garden and home magazine, and even from gardening advice websites. Although you will have variations with each plant, there are some home and garden tips that are universal and those rules go for any plant.

For example, the home gardening tips given for planting is pretty much universal. You must place plants where they will have room to grow so they don’t overcrowd each other. Good air flow is a plus, and plants must be in a position where they will receive adequate amounts of sunlight. A gardeners advice will always tell you to add some type of nutrients, such as mulch or compost, to the soil to promote better plant growth.

Home garden tips on watering plants is a little more varied, because every type of plant needs different amounts of water. For example, you wouldn’t want to water a cactus near as much as you water a tomato plant. How much you water will obviously also depend on where you live, the climate, and how much rain your area receives.

A gardeners advice from nearly every source will tell you that your plants not only need fertilizer when you first plant them, they will also need to be fertilized throughout their growing season. What type of fertilizer you use will depend on the soil content and pH balance, but fertilizer will definitely be needed just about for every plant. Organic composte can be used instead and it is easy to find advice on how to make a compost pile as well as when fertilizer and compost needs to be utilized.

Home gardening tips on weeds, insects, disease, and how to get rid of them is probably the most sought after advice of all in the world of gardening. These pests invade all types of gardens and if you don’t get rid of them, they will take over and ruin your garden. There are many different chemicals and pesticides that can be used, and a gardeners advice will usually clue gardeners in on which chemicals are better, which are harmful, and which ones are easier to administer.

Gardening is not an easy task; you have to fight against many outside forces, such as weather, insects, disease, and weeds. Even the most seasoned of gardeners will seek out a gardeners advice once in a while. Who wouldn’t when there are so many forces that could take a garden out? There is a lot of general home garden tips on the market that goes for any plant, but if you look a little harder you will find specific advice for that one plant that is the only one giving you trouble. A gardeners advice is relatively easy to find, and while you may come across the occasional bad apple, most of it is relatively sound and will help with any gardener questions.

Kali Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here! There you will find 12 free bonus books available for immediate download!




Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Some of the Best Home Garden Magazines-
Gardening Gift Baskets-
Selling at a Farmers Markets-
Six Small Home Gardening Tips-



Basic Tools For Gardening


Nearly every gardener has some type of lawn and garden tool, it’s nearly impossible to have a garden without them. The type of lawn and garden tool you use will obviously depend on the size and extent of your garden, what you are able to handle, if you want to spend a lot of time in your garden or get done quickly, and finally, how much money you are willing to spend.

While many gardeners do not have expensive or high-tech gardening tools, all of them have some type of gardening equipment for cultivating. Tools for cultivating can include both hand held tools and power tools. The type you buy depends upon how serious of a gardener you are. Gardening hand tool include your everyday items such as shovels, spading forks, rakes, trowels, and diggers. They can all be used to get a garden ready for planting and are relatively easy without too much emphasis upon strength for operation. Other tools include a wheel cultivator, pickax, and mattock.

While gardening power tools are a little more expensive than hand tools, they really cut down on the hard labor. The most essential piece of gardening equipment is undoubtedly the tiller. The tiller will break up the ground and get it ready for planting, chop up any debris, and help mix in fertilizer and compost. If you don’t want to spend the money on a tiller you can hire someone or rent a tiller for one time use. Other power tools that are very popular include chippers, garden shredders, and chain-saws.

If you have shrubs, hedges, or small trees in your yard, pruning tools are a vital piece of gardening equipment. Pruning shears are good for branches about ¾” in diameter, while lopping shears can handle branches from a half inch up to about 2 inches. Pole pruners are on a pole and can reach branches about 15 feet above ground. Hedge shears and pruning saws are both larger, more heavy duty pruning tools for the serious gardener.

Since your plants must be watered in order to survive, and lets face it, it doesn’t rain whenever we want it to, gardening equipment for watering is a must have. The one thing you can’t get along without is a water hose, everything after that is optional. Many gardeners use sprinklers or s drip irrigation hose. There are even timers you can purchase for sprinklers or drip hoses, if you are willing to drop the extra cash.

Gardening without gardening equipment would be a nightmare. Sure there are some people who enjoy getting a little dirty while they plant their flowers, but even those types of people have the most basic of gardening tools, like a rake or a hoe. Gardening equipment is a part of gardening, as important as the dirt and the seeds.

Kali Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here! There you will find 12 free bonus books available for immediate download!




Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Six Small Home Gardening Tips-
Gardening Gloves-
Modern Gardening Power Tools-
The Best Tools for Gardening-



Design Japanese Garden


Japanese garden design is a cultural form of gardening that is meant to produce a scene that mimics nature as much as possible by using trees, shrubs, rocks, sand, artificial hills, ponds, and flowing water as art-forms. The Zen and Shinto traditions play a large part in creating Japanese gardens and because of this; the gardens produce a contemplative and reflective state of mind. Creating Japanese gardens is much different than the Western style and most would say it is far more meditational and soul soothing.

To design a Japanese backyard garden, you will need to know that there are three basic methods for scenery. The first of which is called reduced scale. Reduced scale is the art of taking an actual scene from nature, mountains, rivers, trees, and the like and reproducing it on a smaller scale.

Symbolization involves generalization and abstraction. An example of this would be using white sand to suggest the ocean. Borrowed views refers to artists that would use something like an ocean or forest as a background, but it would end up becoming an important element of the scenery.

There are essentially two art forms to design Japanese garden: tsukiyami, which is a hill garden and mainly composed of hills and ponds. The other is hiraniwa, which is basically the exact opposite of tsukiyami: a flat garden without any hills or ponds.

The basic elements used in Japanese garden landscaping include rocks, gravel, water, moss, stones, fences, and hedges. Rocks are most often used as centerpieces and bring a presence of spirituality to the garden. According to the Shinto tradition, rocks embody the spirits of nature. Gravel is used as a sort of defining surface and is used to imitate the flow of water when arranged properly. Stones are used to create a boundary and are sculpted into the form of lanterns. Water, whether it be in the form of a pond, stream, or waterfall, is an essential part of a Japanese garden design. It can be in the actual form of water or portrayed by gravel, but no matter what form of water it’s in, it is crucial to a Japanese gardens balance.

There are several signature forms and types of Japanese garden plants, the main one being Bonsai. Bonsai is the art of training everyday, average plants, such as Pine, Cypress, Holly, Cedar, Cherry, Maple, and Beech, to look like large, old trees just in miniature form. These trees range from five centimeters to one meter and are kept small by pruning, re-potting, pinching new growth, and wiring the branches.

Japanese garden design is a tradition that has crossed the poet, Muso Soseki, who stated “Gardens are a root of transformation”. A Japanese garden is sure to bring about many different feelings and is definitely a transforming experience.

Kali Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!

Learn more about Growing Bonsai’s!
Free Bonus Book Here!




Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Cement Designs for Your Yard-
Caring for Orchids-
Types of Orchids-
All About Garden Ponds-



Avoid Garden Fungus


Most of us are ready to make an investment for landscaping to give a face lift to our homes. Yet we failed when it comes time for some basic plant pruning when our plants need it most. Then we wonder why our highly invested landscape looks terrible. Check out the following home garden tips to avoid garden fungus and to better maintain the life of your garden and lawn:

Home Garden Tips for Pruning
Pruning plays an important role in home garden maintenance. If you accidently make a mistake while pruning, don’t lose heart because it’s like a bad haircut, it is going to grow again.

Avoid Watering in the Evening
During summer, you may experience high humidity, which might result in a lot of problems in your garden. To get your plants nice and dry, tuck them in for the night. In addition to this, watering in the evening should be avoided to prevent damage to the plants.

Powdery White Mildew
Powdery mildew is the most common fungus that affects your ornamental plants. This will create a white film on the leaves of the plants in your garden. Other ornamental plants such as Sand Cherry and Dogwoods are now becoming infected with this fungus. Efficient gardening is necessary to curtail the growth of this fungus. You can easily prevent this by spraying general fungicide which is found at your local garden centre.

Pythium Blight Treatment
If you’re in the north and have perennial Rye grass, then you ought to be very careful not to leave your grass wet at night. A dreadful fungus called Pythium Blight may produce its upper hand. This fungus loves to grow in high humid conditions, mostly during the night.

Pythium blight can easily be seen in the early morning. You can easily recognize this fungus resting on top of the lawn which looks like white cotton candy. You will most likely find this fungus mainly along driveways and walks, where the soil is moist. Pythium rot can easily be controlled by watering in the day at the earliest possible time.

Fire Blight Treatment
Fire Blight is yet another garden fungus culprit which prefers to mostly grow during the summer season. This fungus prefers to attack Pyracantha, cotoneasters, crabapple trees, and Apple trees. The presence of Fire Blight can easily be recognized once one of the branches of the plant turns red and dies. Fire Blight can be prevented by pruning the affected branch and removing it from the main plant as soon as possible.

It is also important that the cut branches be burnt since Fire Blight is extremely contagious. Also wash or dip the projected shears by using alcohol in order to prevent the spread of this deadly fungus to other parts of the branch.

Shotgun fungus
This little gem like fungus, which prefers to grow in mulch and tends to swell, has been termed as the “Shotgun Fungus”. This fungus can fly up to 8 feet in the air and will spatter your house with tiny brown specks. Once Shotgun fungus sticks to your house or windows, it sticks like glue. Most of us suspect the spiders and other aliens for this tiny brown speck. You can’t prevent this fungus, but you can do something by keeping the mulch loose so air can circulate inside to keep this fungus out. Although mulch is great, don’t allow it to get packed and try to remove it at least once a year. Additionally, rake it flat periodically as if it will look like you’ve just mulched.

Kali Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!



Ever Wonder About Household Plant Hazards for Pets !
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Organic Gardening Pest Control-
Disease Free Roses-
Dealing With Moths-
How to Safely Spray Pesticide-
Preventing Diseases in Fruit Trees-



Vegetable Garden Plans


Vegetable gardening has lately become just as popular as going to the grocery store for produce. Vegetable gardening can produce vegetables that are usually cheaper than store bought, and home grown vegetables definitely taste better by far. Vegetable gardening is no different than growing herbs or flowers and if the proper steps are taken and the plants are give the proper care they will flourish and produce very tasty vegetables.

First you must decide what size of garden you wish to plant and then select a location for it; somewhere that has good drainage, good air flow, and good, deep soil. Your garden will also need as much sunlight as possible. Because vegetable gardens have such tasty rewards, animals such as dogs, rabbits, deer, and many others will try and get to your veggies. One way to prevent this is by building a vegetable garden fence, or by putting out a trap to catch mice, moles, and other rodents.

Before planting, the soil must be properly prepared. Good soil for vegetable garden planting is achieved by cultivation along with the application of organic materials. The soil must be tilled (plowed) to control weeds and you must mix mulch into the soil. If you have a small garden, spading would be a better bet than plowing. Mulching is also a vital part of soil preparation.

Organic matter added to the soil releases nitrogen, minerals, and other nutrients plants need to thrive. The most popular and best type of mulch you can use is compost. While the kind and amount of fertilizer used depends on the soil and types of plants, there are some plants that have specific needs; leafy plants, like cabbage, spinach, and lettuce, usually grow better with more nitrogen, while root crops like potatoes, beets, turnips, and carrots require more potash. Tomatoes and beans use less fertilizer, while plants like onions, celery, and potatoes need a larger amount.

One thing that is vitally important in vegetable garden planting is the arrangement. There is no single vegetable garden plan that will work for every garden due to varying conditions. One popular way to arrange a vegetable garden is to plant vegetables needing only limited space together, such as radishes, lettuce, beets, and spinach, and those that require more room together, such as corn, pumpkins, and potatoes. Try to plant tall growing plants towards the back of the garden and shorter ones in the front so that you can make the most out of the available sunlight.

When you are finally ready to begin your vegetable garden planting, make sure to plant at the right time of the season. If you are dying to get an early start, you may want to begin your garden inside in a hotbed and then transplant when the weather permits. After you are finished planting, make sure your vegetables receive the appropriate amount of water, which depends on the type of plant. Most plants will need the equivalent to about an inch of water per week.

Weeds must be controlled in vegetable gardening because they will take away the water, light, and nutrients that are meant for the vegetables themselves. Weeds often bring disease and insects to the garden as well. You can get rid of weeds by cultivation or mulching. To protect against disease and insects you can buy seeds that are disease resistant or use controlled chemicals.

Vegetable gardening is many people’s favorite form of gardening because you can actually taste the fruits of your labor. Vegetable garden planting is not that expensive to start and the taste of home grown vegetables definitely beats that of supermarket veggies. Your vegetable gardening days will be full of produce if you take the proper precautions when planting and continued maintenance of your garden.

Kali Winters is gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here!




Find out how to Avoid Garden Fungus!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Vegetable Gardens for Dummies-
Fall Vegetable Gardening-
Rotating Vegetable Crops-
Vegetables and Their Vitamins-



Fall Vegetable Gardening


Many gardeners do not even consider fall vegetable gardening because of the winter frosts that might make an early appearance. On the contrary, fall vegetable gardening will result in excellent produce and will extend crops long after spring plants have been harvested. Vegetable garden planting in the fall yields a much sweeter and milder vegetable than those grown in the summer and offer a brand new taste to the same old veggies.

What you choose to grow during your fall vegetable gardening will depend on your available space and what you like to eat, just like spring plants. Even the crops that enjoy the heat, such as tomatoes, sweet potatoes, okra, and peppers, will produce until the first frosts hit, which can be pretty late in the year in southern areas. However, there are some plants that will quit towards the end of summer like snap-beans, summer squash, and cucumbers. If these vegetables are planted around the middle of the summer they can be harvested until the first frosts as well. Hardy, tough vegetables will grow until the temperature is as low as 20 degrees, but those that aren’t as strong will only be able to grow through light frosts. Remember that if you have root and tuber plants and the tops are killed by a freeze, the edible part can be saved if a large amount of mulch is used.

When fall vegetable gardening, make sure to pick the vegetables with the shortest growing season so they can be full grown and harvested before the frost arrives. Most seed packages will be labeled “early season”, or you can find the seeds boasting the fewest days to maturity. You may want to go after your seeds for fall vegetable gardening in spring or early summer; they are usually not kept in stock towards the end of summer. If they are stored in a cool, dry location they will keep until you are ready to plant.

In order to know exactly when to plant vegetable gardens in the fall, you must know about when the first hard frost will hit your area. One of the best ways to tell this is by a Farmer’s Almanac. They will give you exact dates and are rarely wrong. You will also need to know exactly how long it is going to take your plants to mature.

To get your soil ready for fall vegetable gardening you must first remove any leftover spring/summer crops and weeds. Crops leftover from the last season may end up spreading bacteria and disease if left in the garden. Spread a couple of inches of compost or mulch over the garden area to increase the nutrients, however, if spring plants were heavily fertilized it may not need much, if any. Till the top layer of soil, wet it down, and let it set for about 12-24 hours. Once this has been done, you are ready to start planting.

Many gardeners will run from fall vegetable gardening so they don’t have to deal with frosts, but if tough, sturdy vegetables are planted they can withstand a few frosts and give you some wonderful tasting produce. Fall vegetable gardening gives you the chance to enjoy your vegetable garden for at least a little bit longer.

Kali Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful,
amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening” is available Here! There you will one of 12 free bonus books regarding Vegetable Companion Planting!




“Herbal Teas” is another free bonus book. Find out more about Herbs!

Successful Gardening!

Other Articles of Interest:

Rotating Vegetable Crops-
Vegetable Gardening Tips-
Vegetable and Their Vitamins-
How to Start a Vegetable Garden in Your Backyard-



Butterfly Flower Garden


When creating a butterfly flower garden, the possibilities of what to include in your butterfly garden design are endless. Below are some helpful suggestions to help you get started. They are designed to spark the creative process of your mind and get you started on your way to creating a lovely butterfly flower garden.

Before you even begin your butterfly flower garden, find out which species of butterflies are in your area. Consider taking an exploratory hike around your location with a butterfly identification book. This may take a little extra time and effort, but the results will be well worth it. After you have compiled your list of local butterfly species, be sure to write down in your butterfly garden plan what these particular species of butterflies use for nectar and food plants.

Make sure that your garden is in a location that provides at least six hours of sunlight per day. Butterflies are cold-blooded creatures and therefore do better where they can be kept warm and protected by shelter.

Wind can be a butterfly’s worst enemy so be sure to incorporate plenty of wind protection in your design. You can plant tall shrubs and other plants in order to create a wind break, but a location that avoids the heavy winds is more appropriate.

The best possible location of all would be a butterfly flower garden placed on the sunny side of your home with windbreaks on both the west and east sides, or wherever the prevailing winds may come from in your area. Try and locate your garden close to a window so you can watch the butterflies from indoors. Provide seating outside too to take in the view as well.

If possible, you could excavate an area and build a stone wall around it. This would create the ideal windbreak for your butterflies. Create gravel pathways around your garden to spare you from walking in the mud.

There are many creative ways for constructing a butterfly flower garden. Take your time to design a garden that you will enjoy and be proud of.

This is but a small excerpt from my new ebook: Holistic Herbs ~ A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening. If you would like to learn more about Holistic Herbs, Landscape and Garden design, Click Here! to pick up your copy today! I’ve also included 12 free bonus books as well.



Want to learn more about Plants that are Hazardous to Pets?
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali Winters

Other Articles of Interest:

Butterfly Garden Design-
How To Flower Garden-
When & How to Prune Rose Bushes-
Types of Orchids-



Vegetable Gardening Tips


With the costs of living increasing all the time, it may be possible to save money and boost your family’s health at the same time by growing vegetables in your backyard. Here are some vegetable gardening tips which will help you in your endeavor.

It’s a good idea to choose your favorite vegetables to grow and plan your vegetable beds for early, middle of the season and the late bloomer varieties.

Most vegetables require at least 6 hours of sunlight per day, some need 8. Some quick growers like lettuce and radishes can be grown between the rows of plants that take longer to mature, like beets and corn, therefore, making full use of the area that’s available.

Throughout dry periods or droughts, vegetable gardens need extra care and watering. Most vegetables benefit from an inch or more of water per week, especially when they are fruiting.

During the growing season watch for insects. If you discover a bug problem early it will be much easier to get a handle on the situation, just be careful not to use pesticides once the vegetables are close to being harvested unless it becomes an absolute necessity. Organic gardening is one healthy and environmental-friendly option. Once you have harvested your crop, put the vegetable waste into your compost pile so that it can be recycled for next springs planting.

It is important to protect your vegetable garden from wild animals looking for a tasty treat. Make sure you start building a vegetable garden fence that will keep out dogs, rabbits, and other animals. The harm done by wandering animals during one season can equal the cost of a fence. A fence also can serve as a framing structure for peas, beans, tomatoes, and other crops that need support.

Protection is needed in order for your vegetable garden to yield a bountiful harvest. Hard work will pay off in the long run if necessary precautions have been made ahead of time. So create your backyard vegetable garden plans today!

This is but a small excerpt from my new ebook: Holistic Herbs ~ A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening. If you would like to learn more about Holistic Herbs, Landscape and Garden design, Click Here and grab your copy today!

Want to learn more about Vegetable Gardening?   How about Growing Tomatoes?
2 Free Bonus Book Here!




Successful Gardening!
Kali Winters

Other Articles of Interest:

Vegetable Gardens for Dummies-
Vegetable Garden Layout-
Backyard Vegetable Garden Ideas-
How to Start a Vegetable Garden in Your Backyard-



Disease Free Roses


To make sure that your prized roses remain in the best of health, simply follow these tips:

1. Black Spots on Leaves

This disease is commonly known as rose bush black spot disease. The appearance of black spots are circular with fringed edges on the leaves. They cause the leaves to turn yellow. Remove the infected foliage and pick up any fallen leaves on the ground around the rose. Artificial sprays may be used to prevent or treat this kind of rose disease.

2. Stunted or malformed young canes

Known as powdery mildew, this is a fungal disease that covers leaves, stems and the buds with a fine, wind spreadable, white powder. It makes the leaves curl and turn purple. Spray with Funginex or Benomyl to treat rose fungal diseases.

3. Blistered underside of leaves

Known as rose rust disease, this is characterized by orange-red blisters that turn black in the fall. It can survive the winter and will then attack new sprouts in the spring. Collect and discard leaves that are infected in the fall. A Benomyl or Funginex spray applied every 7-10 days may help.

4. Malformed or stunted leaves and flowers

This is caused by spider mites. They are tiny yellow, red or green spiders found on the underside of leaves where they suck the juices. An application of Orthene or Isotox may help in treating this infestation.

5. Weak and mottled leaves with tiny white webs under them

This is caused by aphids. They are small, soft-bodied insects that are usually brown, green or red in color. Aphids often cluster under leaves and flower buds and suck the plant juices from tender buds. Malathion or diazinon spray may help roses to survive this rose bush bug.

6. Flowers that don’t open or are deformed when they open.

Thrips could be the reason behind this problem. They are slender, brown-yellow bugs with fringed wings that also suck juices from flower buds. Cut and discard the infested flowers. Orthene and malathion may also treat this problem.

Remember that roses are hungry feeders that require a lot of fertilizer to remain healthy bushes. By following the tips mentioned above, you will soon have disease free roses!

This is but a small excerpt from my new ebook: Holistic Herbs ~ A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening. If you would like to learn more about Holistic Herbs, Landscape and Garden design, Click Here to grab your copy today!

Want to learn more about Bonsai’s?
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali Winters



Other Articles of Interest:

When & How to Prune Rose Bushes-
Rose Gardening Tips-
Growing Orchids Indoors-
Basic Flower Garden Design-



Benefits of Kids Gardens


We can all see how nature is treated these days. It’s a sad thing to know that people do not pay attention so much anymore to the environmental problems. What can we do about this? It’s as simple as starting with our children. It is good to see the children’s involvement with environmental-friendly activities. One such nature-loving activity that children could easily get their hands on is kids gardens. Why should you consider gardening activities for kids?

Here are some gardening lesson plans for kids:

1. Science

Through childrens gardening, they are indirectly taught the wonders of science like the plant’s life cycle and how human’s intervention can make or break the environment. They can have a first hand experience on the miracle of life through a seed. This would definitely be a new and enjoyable experience for the kids.

2. Life

Watching a seed grow into a tree is just as wondrous as the conception to birth and growth of a child. In time, kids will learn to love their plants and appreciate the life plants provide. Gardening for kids could actually help simulate how life should be treated — it should be with care. The necessities to live will be emphasized through children and gardening such as – water, sunlight, air and soil. Those necessities could easily be corresponded to human necessities, i.e., water, shelter, air, food. By simply weeding out, one could educate children on how bad influences should be avoided to be able to live life happy and productively.

3. Relaxation

Studies show that gardening in general can reduce stress because of its calming effect. This is applicable to any age group. More so, it stimulates all the five senses. Believe it or not, gardening may be used as a therapy to children who have been abused or those who are members of broken homes. It helps build one’s self-esteem.

4. Quality Time with the Family

You can forget about your stressful work life for a while by being soothed through the lovely ambience in the garden. It a chance to play and spend quality time with your children. You can talk while watering the plants or you can work quietly beside each other. The bottom line is, always do what you have to do, together with your kids. You might discover a lot of new things about your child while mingling with them in your garden.

Let kids become aware of their environment’s needs. One way to jumpstart that environmental education may be through gardening. It’s hitting two birds with one stone — teach them to respect life while you bond with them as well.

This is but a small excerpt from my new ebook: Holistic Herbs ~ A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening. If you would like to learn more about Holistic Herbs, Landscape and Garden design, Click Here! to grab your copy today! I’ve also included 12 free bonus books as well.

Successful Gardening!
Kali Winters




Other Articles of Interest:

Gardening Gift Basket-
Some of the Best Home Garden Magazines-
Herbal Medicine for Children-
My First Tree-



The Best Tools For Gardening


Different kinds of gardens require different kinds of garden tools. Hardware stores mostly cater to a wide range of tools, but there are shops that specialize in the more expensive kind of garden tool that shouts quality. Wherever you decide to shop, here are a few pointers to guide you.

Do you have a small garden or a large one? A small garden will not require the same large equipment that would be used in an extensive one. A ride-on mower is unnecessary if you only have a small strip of lawn. Another point to consider is who does most of the gardening? Some tools are too heavy for women to use comfortably.

When you buy secateurs make sure the blade always stays sharp to avoid damaging the plant. Look for models that have blades that can be sharpened or replaced, models with tension control and with sizes that best fit your hands. Secateurs usually cost around $50 – $130.

Hedge trimmers or shears are handy – but only if you have a hedge, or plan on growing one. Some hedge trimmers have curved blades to stop branches from sliding out when cut.

Pitch Forks are used for turning and aerating compost and breaking up lumps of soil. The cheaper ones are often not strong enough for heavy soil, so go for sturdiness instead of price. Forks usually cost around $30 – $100.

A shovel has a scoop blade and is best used to move around dirt and garden soil. A spade has a flat blade great for cutting edges, digging and dividing plants. The edge of a spade should be kept sharpened for clean and efficient cutting so it will cause the least amount of damage to plants. These are a basic garden necessities and usually range from $30 – $50.

A pruning saw is used for pruning trees and larger shrubs, while secateurs are for plants like roses. Pruning saws have a narrow curved blade that fits between stems or branches and easily cuts them as you pull the saw backwards. They are approximately $27- $55.

A chipping hoe is a handy tool for getting rid of small weeds. The Dutch or push-hoe is slightly more user-friendly due to the fact that the action required to use the hoe does not jar the neck and shoulders quite as much.

A rake is also a basic requirement for the garden. A strong rake with a flat head and sharp metal prongs is used for smoothing a garden bed and getting out the last of the bumps and weeds. The plastic rake is used to gather leaves and grass clippings only.

Gardening tools don’t have to be expensive. Flea markets and garage sales can be excellent places to pick up great tool bargains.

Even though there is a lot of information you need to absorb and understand about gardening in your backyard, the rewards are worthwhile. Growing vegetables and herbs at home is easy but only with a bit of knowledge and patience. I hope this article has given you a bit of inspiration to complete your pursuit for knowledge on your own backyard garden. Be sure to read the rest of the articles indicated to the right…. for further knowledge…order my book…

Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening”.

Want to learn more about Vegetable Growing? How About Growing Tomatoes?
2 Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali Winters




Other Articles of Interest:

Gardeners Gloves-
Modern Gardening Power Tools-
Basic Tools for Gardening-
Six Small Home Gardening Tips-



Some of the Best Home Garden Magazines


Various home garden magazines are available in the market today. But would you like to know which stands out from the rest? Here is a selection of home garden magazines that anyone that has a passion for gardening will appreciate.

COUNTRY GARDENS often showcases the more unusual gardens around the country. It introduces wonderful new ways to enjoy garden sights and scents. It helps the avid gardener to create an eye-pleasing, fragrance – filled country garden.

This magazine has very useful advice on setting up and caring for your garden. Every issue contains profiles of fascinating people and their gardens, inspiration gardens and detailed garden design plans. Best of all, it’s a trusted source of information that’s easy to understand. Every season carries a vast harvest of ideas to delight, motivate and guide any gardener.

How about a gardening magazine for those who want to become a better gardener? FINE GARDENING MAGAZINE from The Taunton Press brings you amazing design ideas, beneficial techniques, and the know-how to get the best results from your gardening endeavors.

In each issue you’ll find eye-opening bits of advice from the experts, detailed information on all types of plants, effective techniques and time-saving tips, straightforward tool reviews from editors and readers and planting suggestions for specific regions.

But for more intensive information on how to maintain a garden packed with style and color, then you’ll want to read GARDEN DESIGN. This home garden magazines eye-popping photos, illustrations and useful recommendations brings out inspiration on how to create a picture-perfect garden. It is written and designed for those who are passionate about their homes and gardens. Garden Design is more than just a dig-in-the-dirt gardening magazine; it’s for people who enjoy bringing in more aesthetic value for their homes through their gardens.

Garden Design encourages you to create stylish outdoor living spaces and rare gardens through cultivating rare breeds of plants, with updates on the best tools and techniques. It contains magnificent photographs and articles that capture the imaginations of gardeners everywhere.

For passionate gardeners, HOLTICULTURE MAGAZINE is the ultimate guide to gardening. The authoritative voice of gardeners, Horticulture serves as an essential guide and trusted friend, and is a main resource for serious gardeners from every corner of the country.

These magazines aim to instruct, inform, and inspire serious home gardeners. There are gardening magazines for beginners and expert gardeners. Discover or develop your green thumb with their latest gardening techniques and garden design information.

For Australian readers, there is BURKE’S BACKYARD. Springing form a TV series of the same name, Burke’s Backyard focuses on gardening décor as well as the all-important small backyard garden makeovers that have become so popular.

YOUR GARDEN is another beauty, claiming the prestige of being Australia’s gardening magazine, it usually features two or three popular flowers and how best to grow them, with a wealth of tips and information on other plants, tools and products for the garden.

GARDENING AUSTRALIAsprings from the ABC’s feature of that name it features many wonderful articles by gardening experts and often holds a free catalogue from one of the larger nurseries.

Kali Winters is a gardening enthusiast and author who spends much of her time teaching others how to setup and maintain beautiful, amazing gardens. Her latest book, “Holistic Herbs-A Beginners Guide on Herbal Gardening” is available Here!

Learn How to Grow Bonsai’s!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!




Other Articles of Interest:

Gardening Gift Basket-
Benefits of Kids Gardens-
Garden Aerator Basics-
Gardeners Gloves-



Six Small Home Gardening Tips


Beautiful small backyards can still hold a well-maintained garden design, only two things are required – determination and know-how. Here are some tips on how to keep your small backyard oasis looking spruced up and glamorous.

1. Deadheading Flowers
Keep your borders free from wilted flowers and dried leaves. Deadheading plants or removing dead flower heads will encourage the plants to produce more blooms for a longer period of time. Many perennials such as geraniums and dahlias, and some annuals benefit from having spent blooms removed.

2. Pinching Out Plants.
Certain plants – especially foliage plants like Coleus – respond with a spurt of growth when their tops are pinched out. Pinching out plants encourages a more bushier plant and so more blooms are produced. Fuchsias are prone to becoming leggy unless they are pinched out.

3. Don’t Over Fertilized Plants.
A minimal amount of fertilizer will further boost the growth of your vegetation. If you water your yard frequently, you will have to fertilize it more regularly because of the nutrient depletion. A nightly application of liquid fertilizer is sometimes more beneficial than granules as it is more readily absorbed by the leaves. Your container gardening plants will be considerably healthier with a half-strength solution of liquid fertilizer applied regularly.

4. Weeding Plants.
One of the best ways to preserve the beauty of your small garden design is to weed it out. Remember, weeds compete with your plants for both nutrients and moisture. If the weeds are not close to seeding, leave them on the bed to rot down for mulch. If you must use a weedicide, try and get a wick applicator, rather than a spray. This will protect your plants from spray-drift.

5. Water them well
One good tip when it comes to watering your small backyard oasis is to give it a thorough soaking once a week, making sure there is no run-off to cause erosion. Deep watering will encourage the growth of deeper roots that will be able to withstand dry spells in the weather.

6. Say no to chemicals
Chemicals are dangerous to humans and often kill the natural predators of the common garden pests in your garden, so avoid them if possible. There are many organic alternatives that work almost as well.

With these simple tips, your beautiful small backyards design will soon be the envy of your neighbors.

Even though there is a lot of information you need to absorb and understand about backyard designs for small yards, the rewards are worthwhile. A small garden design is easy but only with a bit of knowledge and patience. This article was provided to get some of your gardening questions answered. Be sure to read the rest of the articles indicated to the right…. for further knowledge…order my book…

Learn more about Plants that are Hazardous to Pets?
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali Winters




Other Articles of Interest:

Home Garden Tips-
Vegetable Gardening Tips-
Rose Gardening Tips-
Orchid Watering Tips-



Modern Gardening Power Tools


The types and quality of equipment you use to take care of your plants not only has an effect on your plants’ health, but your own as well.

Defective tools could cause damage to your plants, but it is worse if they are so uncomfortable to use that they give you blisters or a bad back. To avoid this, look for the gardening equipment that will do the best job for your type of gardening. It must have the right amount of power to be energy efficient while also being able to do the job without causing you any more strain than necessary.

Here is a review of gardening equipment from the gardening experts themselves.

1. Garden Shredders

JCB SS2400 received five stars out of five from the gardening equipment reviewers from recommendedbuys.co.uk. It has a 2400 watt motor and comes with a silent gear crushing system. It is one promising tool to improve and hasten your shredding activity.

Ryobi ESR – 2240 Electric Shredder is an easy to assemble garden shredder suitable for prunings up to 40mm. It comes with built-in wheels and a plunger for increased portability.

2. Hedge Trimmer

Bosch AHS42-16 Electric Hedge Trimmer also received five stars out of five rating from the gardening equipment reviewers from recommendedbuys.co.uk. It has 420 watt output.

3. Cultivators

Mantis Tiller Cultivator comes with patented tines to aid in cutting smoothly through hard, compacted soil. It is perfect for preparing vegetable plots, flower beds, etc. It also helps in thatching, aerating and cleaning moss. It also comes with a free border edger.

4. Lawnmowers

Brill 78370 Luxus Push Reel Mower was rated 4.5 out of 5 stars by Tools-hills.com customers. It has a large top cover that protects shrubs and overhanging flowers.

American Lawnmower Deluxe Light Reel Mower 1815-16 received 4.5 stars out of 5 from Epinions.com buyers. It is a push-mower and it does not cause pollution, but it is not suitable for tall grass.

5. Leaf Sweeper

Agri-fab 26 Push Leaf Sweeper is for smaller lawns and is available with a 200 litre collector. It also comes with an infinite height adjustment feature.

Even though there is a lot of information you need to absorb and understand about backyard gardening, the rewards are worthwhile. Growing vegetables and herbs at home is easy but only with a bit of knowledge and patience. I hope this article has given you a bit of inspiration to complete your pursuit for knowledge on your own backyard garden. Be sure to read the rest of the articles indicated to the right…. for further knowledge…order my book… “Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening”.

Learn more about Greenhouses!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali Winters




Other Articles of Interest:

The Best Tools for Gardening-
Basic Tools for Gardening-
Gardeners Gloves-
Indoor Hydroponic Gardening-



Gloves for Gardening


Gardeners gloves protect your hands from blisters, thorns and cuts while doing rough work like digging or pruning in the garden. Investing in one or more pairs of quality gloves is a good decision and a great investment.

Here are some tips on how to choose the appropriate pair that will suit your needs the best:

1. Look for quality leather garden gloves with a back cloth; this will let the gloves breathe and keep your hands dry, cool and comfortable. Goatskin gardening gloves are one option. There are also deerskin garden gloves available as well.

2. If mud bothers or effects you, select rubber gloves with a cotton lining inside. The cotton keeps your hands warm while digging deep into the cool mud.

3. When spraying pesticides or chemicals choose gloves that are made from neoprene, a synthetic rubber. Gloves made from latex or any other type of plastic may not offer the best protection if the chemicals should happen to penetrate the glove and get onto your hands.

4. There are gardening gloves for roses available in the market as well. These extra long gardening gloves reach all the way up the arms which makes them perfect for pruning rose bushes.

5. If you usually operate large garden power tools, buy gloves in the color brown instead of red as the latter may dye your hands when your hands become wet or sweaty.

6. Light cotton or even fingerless gloves may be useful for transplanting seedlings. They will allow more dexterity and also help to prevent the tiny roots from being crushed.

7. And of course, make sure that the gloves you buy actually fit your hands. If you have small hands, try the children’s gardening section. There’s nothing worse than trying to garden in gloves that are too big.

Your gloves must be comfortable as well as give protection to best serve your gardening needs.

This is but a small excerpt from my new ebook: Holistic Herbs ~ A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening. If you would like to learn more about Holistic Herbs, Landscape and Garden design, Click Here! to grab your copy today!

Learn More About Natural Herbal Cures!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali Winters




Other Articles of Interest:

Orchid Watering Tips-
Vegetable Gardening Tips-
Rose Gardening Tips-
Home Garden Tips-



How to Flower Garden


Knowing how to flower garden can make a big difference in the look and over-all health of your plants. Here are some simple hints to make your garden bloom with health:

1. The essentials must always be given major consideration.

Your flower garden must have an adequate supply of water, sunlight, and fertile soil. Any lack of these basic necessities will greatly affect the health of plants. Water the flower garden more frequently during dry spells.

When using flower garden bulbs, make sure they are planted at the correct depth. When planting out shrubs and perennials, make sure that you don’t heap soil or mulch up around the stem. If you do, water will drain off instead of sinking in, and the stem could develop rot through overheating.

2. Mix and match perennials with annuals.

Perennial flower garden bulbs need not to be replanted since they grow and bloom for several years while annuals grow and bloom for only one season. Mixing a few perennials with annuals ensures that you will always have blooms coming on.

3. Deadhead to encourage more blossoms.

Deadheading is simply snipping off the flower head after it wilts. This will make the plant produce more flowers. Just make sure that you don’t discard the deadhead on the garden or mildew and other plant disease will attack your plants.

4. Know the good from the bad bugs.

Most garden insects do more good than harm. Butterflies, beetles and bees are known pollinators. They fertilize plants through unintentional transfer of pollen from one plant to another. 80% of flowering plants rely on insects for survival.

Sowbugs and dung beetles together with fungi, bacteria and other microorganisms are necessary to help in the decomposition of dead plant material, thus enriching the soil and making more nutrients available to growing plants.

Other insects like lacewings and dragonflies are natural predators of those insects that do the real damage, like aphis.

An occasional application of liquid fertilizer when plants are flowering will keep them blooming for longer.

Always prune any dead or damaged branches. Fuchsias are particularly prone to snapping when you brush against them. The broken branch can be potted up to give you a new plant, so it won’t be wasted.

This is but a small excerpt from my new ebook: Holistic Herbs ~ A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening. If you would like to learn more about Holistic Herbs, Landscape and Garden design, Click Here to grab your copy today!

Find Out More About Orchids!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali S. Winters




Other Articles of Interest:

Caring for Orchids-
Butterfly Flower Garden-
Rose Gardening Tips-
Orchid Watering Tips-



Butterfly Garden Design


What is butterfly gardening? Simply put butterfly gardening is the art of growing flowers and plants that will attract these colorful and dainty creatures to your garden. Delight your family and visitors with beautiful butterflies, but be sure to create a safe habitat for them. If you own cats rethink your plans, because it would be a shame to invite these lovely insects to their death.

Butterfly garden design is a matter of personal preference. Typical points to consider are the size of your garden and the types of flowers and plants you want to grow. Pick a style of garden that appeals to you, but ensure it also contains the plants and flowers that appeal to the butterflies you wish to attract as well.

It is important to find out which plants and flowers will attract the species of butterflies that live in your area. This information can be found at the local library.

To create the kind of environment that they find attractive, you will also need water of some kind. A birdbath will look attractive and keep the butterflies up off the ground, away from stray cats or mischievous puppies. Butterfly garden dishes or any shallow dish on a post or hung in a tree will do just as well.

When planning your butterfly garden design, be careful how you coordinate the colors you’ve chosen for your flowerbeds. Although butterflies do not care about your choice of color, you don’t want your garden to be a hodgepodge of unrelated colors and textures. Butterflies are attracted to those flowers that have nectar rather than pollen, like honeysuckle, milkweed, summer lilac, Valerian, daisies, Purple Coneflower, Yellow Sage, day lilies and lavender.

Some people find it helpful to draw and color a layout of their butterfly garden design to see what the finished product would look like. Keep in mind that warm colors like red and orange are flashy and showy. These colors have a greater impact against a strong green background. Cool colors such as blue and purple are soothing and toned down and would work better with a white contrast to create the look of freshness and brightness.

This is but a small excerpt from my new ebook: Holistic Herbs ~ A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening. If you would like to learn more about Holistic Herbs, Landscape and Garden design, go to Click Here! to pick up your copy today!

Check out “The Golden Book of Orchids”!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali S. Winters




Other Articles of Interest:

More on Butterfly Flower Gardens-
How to Flower Garden-
Rose Gardening Tips-
Basic Flower Garden Designs-



Basic Flower Garden Designs


Many times we buy plants on impulse then find there is nowhere in the garden that really suits them. Before buying plants carefully examine your garden to see how much sun and shade it gets, whether the soil is well drained or waterlogged and whether your aspect is sheltered or windswept. You’ll then be equipped to go and buy the best plants for your situation; a shade plant for the sheltered areas, sun-lovers for the warm spots, drought-resistant plants for the parched areas which may be either sunny or shaded, and swamp plants for the poorly-drained parts.

But wait! Test your soil first, to determine the pH level of your soil and what kind of nutrients you need to add, if any. Is the soil acid or alkaline? Most plants prefer soil that is slightly acidic, but there are some that must have alkaline soil to grow. You can alter the soil’s pH level, but it’s much easier to simply plant for the soil you have.

Now you are ready to plant. Well – almost. Will you plant in groups or plant solo? If you buy ‘one of everything’ your garden may seem rather spotty. Group plantings are organised, harmonious and you can vary the color for interest.

Before planting, place your chosen plants around the garden bed in their pots to see how they will look. Re-arrange them until you are satisfied. Grouping plants in sets of threes or fives usually looks better than planting in groups of even numbers. Be sure that you have an interesting combination of colors and textures of plants. Tall plants should go to the back, or the centre if your garden will be viewed equally from all sides. Try to keep your plants away from trees. The roots of trees are fiercely competitive and will steal all the nutrients and moisture meant for your flowers.

The right color scheme is one way to maintain the harmony in your garden. Imagine the color of the flowers when they are in bloom. Some colors may clash with others, but can still be planted side-by-side if they have a different blooming season. Foliage color is also important. Many flower plants have silver, grey or purplish foliage that is just as attractive as the flower. This means that they are still attractive well past the blooming season and so have added value.

This is but a small excerpt from my new ebook: Holistic Herbs ~ A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening. If you would like to learn more about Holistic Herbs, Landscape and Garden design, Click Here to pick up your copy today!

Learn more about Orchids!
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali S. Winters




Other Articles of Interest:

Butterfly Flower Garden-
Butterfly Garden Design-
How to Flower Garden-
Orchid Growing Tips-



Garden Aerator Basics


Do you long for a beautiful lush, green lawn, but your yard is just not cooperating? You’ve probably fertilized and watered your lawn 10 times over, year after year, thinking that may be the trick. Sometimes you may feel that you’re in a catch 22: If you don’t feed, fertilize and water your lawn, it will die. If you do feed, fertilize and water your lawn, it will die as well.

Your soil might be the culprit. If your soil contains clay, for instance, it can over time become as dense as a brick. Ever try growing something on a brick? Nothing is able to penetrate the surface. If you are struggling to grow in heavily, compacted soil, no wonder you have failed to make anything thrive no matter how much water or fertilizer you feed it.

Clay is made of very small, tiny particles. Works great for pottery but not very well suited for lawns. When you mold clay, it becomes shaped and compacted. Just think of your lawn after many sunny afternoons of outdoor fun with the kids. Your lawn has become compacted over time with all the heavy traffic. It essentially turns into a hard brick.

You may find that not every patch of soil on your lawn is the same. Under the trees or bushes for example, it may be moist and fertile, however not very well suited for grass because of the lack of sun. Other spots on your lawn will be denser than others. Just look along the driveway after the winter snow removal or how about that well worn shortcut to the sidewalk or driveway. Let us not forget the kid’s bike trails or the dog run. All these instances are the culprit of soils compacted.

You may have spent every weekend slaving over your lawn, but if the soils compacted you won’t get any results. To fix compacted soil you must first preform a couple of tests. The first test consists of simply going out to your lawn and trying to stick a sharpened pencil into the soil. If it breaks before you are able to penetrate the surface, than your soil is the culprit and you may be dealing with clay. Another test is to turn on the hose and let the sprinkler run for a bit. If the water sits on top of your lawn you have compacted soil. What ever you have applied to your lawn, whether its fertilizer, food or water was basically a waste of resources. You need to get those nutrients to the grass roots.

Aerate Definition:

One of the best ways to combat compaction is aerating. Aerating is the process of extracting holes about the size of a piece of chalk, evenly spaced over the surface of your lawn. Aerator equipment such as a plug type aerator or a deep core aerator are available for sale or rent at your local hardware store. Or you may just want to do a manual aerator by attaching aerating spikes or lawn aerator shoes to your kid’s and send them outdoors to play in the yard for the afternoon. Seriously, there are aerate lawn shoes available in the marketplace. The main point is that it is hard to overdo aerating lawns. Each hole will be a portal for water and fertilizer to reach the grassy roots.

Once the holes are open, you then want to spread compost evenly, about an inch deep, over your entire lawn. Rake it in after ward to make sure that it gets “forced” into all the holes. This will allow the water and fertilizer to slowly be absorbed into the surrounding soil.

After you have aerated and placed a top layer of compost on the old lawn, you will then need to reseed your lawn so that your grass will grow back with a heavier “coat”. The grass seed will embed themselves into the holes, where there will be plenty of room for moisture, allowing the roots to grow.

If your lawn has developed patches of bald spots, you can aerate on a smaller scale. You can either buy a hand operated aerating tool or use a spading or pitchfork to create the holes. Any tool will do as long as it perforates the soil deep enough, the deeper the better, to enable the compost and seeds to penetrate the soil. Just remember to keep the kids, cars, dogs and oh yes, the spouse off the area until the grass has filled in!

For further knowledge…order my book…

Holistic Herbs~A Beginners Guide to Herbal Gardening”.

Learn more about Greenhouses?
Free Bonus Book Here!

Successful Gardening!
Kali S. Winters




Other Articles of Interest:

Home Garden Tips-
Vegetable Gardening Tips-
How to Start a Garden in Your Backyard-